Higher Education Blogs | Blog U

Blogs

Posts

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Blog U
November 10, 2008 - 10:09pm
(Happily, this isn't a concrete issue for me now. This just falls under "I've always wondered…") What are the rules governing faculty votes of no confidence? I've been lucky enough that I haven't actually faced one of these, either directly or indirectly, which may explain some of my ignorance on the subject. From a spectator's perspective, they strike me as somewhat ambiguous.
November 10, 2008 - 9:52pm
It doesn't make sense. Fourteen hours of mostly sitting around shouldn't leave me more tired (and certainly more stiff) than fourteen hours of farmwork, but it does. Or it has. Because I am. Still, it was a day generally well spent. Bookends of problem perception surrounding useful insights into solutions. The opening bookend was Van Jones. Inspirational and celebratory, but with a hands-on, pragmatic perspective. Three underlying problems:
November 10, 2008 - 9:49pm
One of the things I do when I'm not teaching or preparing for class, not grading or cooking or working on my research -- one of the things I do relatively rarely, in other words -- is knit. I like to knit. It satisfies on many levels. For one, it allows me to create something without requiring great effort -- I just follow the directions. I don't need to think very hard about it. It can be done while I am watching TV, or listening to the radio, or even (once) listening to a conference paper. Sometimes I get a Christmas gift out of it, or a warm scarf for myself.
November 10, 2008 - 7:43am
An alert reader sent me a link to this story about New Hampshire. Apparently, the Granite State is considering funneling most high school students into community colleges after tenth grade. (Tellingly, the story allows that "those who want to go to a prestigious university may stay and finish the final two years.") This is one of those ideas that carries in it a real grain of truth, but that takes it much too far.
November 9, 2008 - 8:22pm
To save gas, money and GHG emissions, a number of us from the Backboro area shared a ride to AASHE 2008. Specific jobs differed, but everyone was concerned in some way with campus sustainability. That's why it struck me as odd when, while we were driving through a particularly commercially dense portion of Virginia (I-95, a bit south of Washington DC), someone in the car remarked on how much they'd love to live in an area like that. You know, with any store you wanted, so you could just go out and buy what you needed.
November 7, 2008 - 4:03pm
Before Crazy Larry dropped out to play the train conductor in some holiday “experience” that we aren’t allowed to call The Polar Express down at the mall, he was an IT manager at a famous university. He and his staff provided support to administrators and faculty, some of whom willfully refused to help themselves yet expected instant and total service. There’s a triage for this sort of thing when resources are limited—resources are always limited—but out of some sense of privilege the faculty especially felt they shouldn’t have to play by the rules.
November 7, 2008 - 11:19am
Greenback U is located in the northeastern quadrant of the lower 48. Raleigh, NC is in the southeast quadrant. And Raleigh is where this year's AASHE conference is taking place, so I guess it's not just the Dow that's headed south. It will be a pretty full schedule -- pre-conference workshops on Sunday, opening plenaries Sunday evening, sessions from 7:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. on Monday, then again from 8:00 a.m. until about 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday. I'm already looking forward to getting back to work, so I can get some rest!
November 7, 2008 - 4:42am
According to IHE, President-elect Obama has supported a fully refundable tax credit of $4000 for the first two years of college. Whether this (or anything akin to it) has a chance of seeing the light of day is another question, but it's a neat idea to bat around.
November 6, 2008 - 9:11pm
The American Mathematical Society recently published a study (Cross-Cultural Analysis of Students with Exceptional Talent in Mathematical Problem Solving) that finds evidence to disprove the widely held idea that girls are not as good at math as boys are. Instead, the relative small percent of girls excelling in math is traced to cultural forces found in the U.S., forces that can be changed so girls can approach the study of math with an open mind.
November 6, 2008 - 2:39pm
Lost among the stories about the ongoing election, NPR's "Day to Day" program on Tuesday carried a bit about a really interesting fungus, recently discovered. The discoverer, Dr. Gary Strobel of Montana State, described the organism as an endophyte -- an entity that lives within plants -- and its most interesting property (at least to my ears) as the fact that it puts out a liquid which is directly usable as a fully satisfactory diesel fuel.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Most

  • Viewed
  • Commented
  • Past:
  • Day
  • Week
  • Month
  • Year
Loading results...
Back to Top