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April 22, 2012
The university community in Russia has widely discussed a recent proposal of the Ministry of Education and Science to introduce obligatory professional qualification exams for all university graduates. While such systems exist in a number of countries, for Russia this idea is new and for some universities, scary. It is every teacher’s nightmare that he or she will be accountable for their students’ results as the exam seems certain to be implemented. Why does the Russian Minister of Education and Science, Andrei Fursenko, believe that this measure to be a promising one and why is now best time to introduce it?  
April 22, 2012
Over the past eighteen months, Ben has considered, at various times, attending a university in another country; a marvelous but outrageously expensive arts college in North Carolina; and an equally pricy Florida school where he could play baseball year-round.
April 22, 2012
Think about the last document you printed.  What if you could unprint it? In other words, what if you could ‘erase’ the ink and reuse the paper? This might not be as far-fetched as it sounds. 
April 21, 2012
Some thoughts on MOOCs, community, college composition and robot essay graders.
April 21, 2012
Periodically, as things happen to our adjunct heroes, I will update their stories here.
April 20, 2012
Some thoughts on what's been going on in higher ed.
April 19, 2012
If you haven’t seen this interview with Jane Wellman, it’s well worth a read.  She’s an expert on the drivers of college costs, and she was the founding director of the Delta Cost Project.
April 19, 2012
There are few higher education institutions that would report a disinterest in becoming more internationally connected, more open to international students or being able to offer more international research opportunities to their faculty.
April 19, 2012
From Thursday morning to Saturday night, I have been (and will continue to be) reporting live from the Society for American Archaeology 2012 conference in Memphis, TN. I am currently a second year PhD graduate student in Anthropology, with a focus on Archaeology. Conferences are important, regardless of your discipline. As a grad student we can easily settle into our departments, but the real world is much more diverse and is a reality we need to learn to face. Not only are the people attending your academic conference the same individuals who shape the discipline, they are also your peers.
April 19, 2012
The Supremes have agreed to hear a case that has some troubling implications for libraries. Kirtsaeng v. Wiley is not just about textbooks. It’s about whether any work that is copyrighted and produced outside the United States can be legally loaned or resold in the U.S. without the copyright owner’s permission. We’re talking about the First Sale Doctrine, which is how libraries get away with our profligate sharing.

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