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November 11, 2010
What's new [with technology]? How do you do it? You must be online all the time? I get asked these questions all of the time. Sometimes it happens when I'm speaking in front of a group of student affairs professionals. People often assume that I am online all of the time. That I am constantly connected to the web. I always tell people that my method of receiving and digesting technology news and information is really not that complicated. It's a combination of experience (time does matter) and a well-connected / well-placed network of sites and tools.
November 11, 2010
Actual dinner conversation:TW: So-and-so is dumb as a rock.TG: Rocks aren’t dumb!
November 11, 2010
The buzz at the recent Charleston Conference (and practically every other recent conference at which academic librarians have gathered) is a combination of new formats and a new collection development philosophy, shifting from print collections with titles chosen by librarians and faculty to making thousands of e-books available and letting the purchasing choices be made by "patrons"--an old-fashioned term for library users of all stripes, a large contingent of which are undergraduates writing "research papers" that
November 11, 2010
I like conferences, I confess. There are so many types of conferences these days that it is hard to choose one’s favorites: there are “regular” conferences, a slowly vanishing category. Then we have virtual conferences, which may be poised to become the new regular kind, with many billions in value.
November 11, 2010
One way that economists commonly use statistics is to do “forecasting”, to take what is known about today and to use it to predict what will happen tomorrow. I usually use statistics in ways that don’t involve forecasting in the future, but instead to test for relationships in data from the present. Still, there are times I wish I could forecast the future and know how things will look years from now. For example, I wished I could have such a “crystal ball” the other day.
November 11, 2010
It's time to order the books for my spring courses. Because I teach Victorian novels, I'm continually trying to negotiate length; how many pages can I coax my students to read a week (or rather from Thursday to Tuesday, and then from Tuesday to Thursday). This causes me to engage in one of my disingenuous teaching practices: searching for the shortest edition of David Copperfield, or Middlemarch. Yes, I realize that all unabridged versions are really the same number of total words. But tell that to students asked to read 250 pages instead of 150.
November 10, 2010
“But I have to tell you, the biggest objection to [regulation] has come from the fact that The Washington Post would go out of business if Kaplan went out of business.....,” Roberts said with a chuckle. “Because The Washington Post money all comes from Kaplan.....” --'Learning From For-Profits' IHE, 11/8/10 Jack Stripling
November 10, 2010
I had the pleasure of attending the NACAS Annual Conference in Colorado Springs this week. Campus auxiliary services professionals from a variety of higher education institutions came together to attend/present education sessions, network, and expand their knowledge as practitioners.
November 10, 2010
A recent Saturday morning with my son was a treasure: he invited me to play Lego with him. I made a pot of tea and brought it over to the living room rug to join him in the middle of the Lego piles. He was nice enough not to say anything about my violation of our house rule forbidding food or drink in the living room. I dug through the plastic tote full of parts to pick out the pieces that looked interesting to me. Instead of picking out his own blocks, my son watched me intently. As I started to put the plastic bricks and tubes together I felt nervous under his scrutiny.

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