Higher Education Blogs | Blog U

Blogs

Posts

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Blog U
September 14, 2008 - 2:08pm
One of the decisions each campus has to make, early in the process of doing a greenhouse gas inventory, is where to set the borders, or boundaries, to be analyzed. What geographic locations will be included? What vehicles? What activities? Defining scope is probably the most important task, at the outset.
September 12, 2008 - 9:26pm
I'm sitting on Leslie Whittington's bench. Born 1955. You can only follow one or two stories, and of course UD - a George Washington University professor who has spent research time in Australia - has followed Leslie's. She was a Georgetown University professor, on sabbatical, on her way - with her husband and daughters - to a research appointment in Australia. She was almost the same age as UD.
September 12, 2008 - 4:12pm
“Take a stand!” I urged a freshman in a conference during office hours just this morning. “Your paper is wishy-washy. You readers want you to have an opinion and support it with evidence from your research!” “But,” she pleaded, “What if I have mixed feelings?” I urged her to try to quantify her mixed feelings as a percentage and go with the side that’s higher. “But what if it’s fifty-fifty?” Well. Then you go with your gut and support the side that feels right this morning.
September 12, 2008 - 1:04pm
The fall semester was only two weeks old, and we’d already worked through Irving, Hawthorne, and Poe. But my students and I didn’t know each other well yet, and I was aware when I assigned Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street” that the add/drop date hadn’t passed.
September 11, 2008 - 10:16pm
This story in IHE is somehow both shocking and unsurprising.
September 11, 2008 - 3:02pm
Much of my life, this week, is focused on finalizing Greenback U's greenhouse gas inventory as it's going to be reported under the terms of the Presidents Climate Commitment. Not the numbers themselves -- those were pretty much set in stone (barring late discovery of outright error) back in the spring. Rather, I'm finalizing the "narrative" which will get submitted along with the numbers -- what's important, how it was calculated, what it means.
September 10, 2008 - 9:53pm
I've never found an elegant way around the add/drop period. This is the time of the semester when late-adding students show up to the second (or even third) meeting of a class, asking to be caught up and held harmless. In lecture classes, it's not that big a deal; you just tell the student he's responsible for whatever he has missed so far, and that's that. But in classes that do group work, or hands-on work, or anything intensely interactive, it's a real imposition.
September 10, 2008 - 9:39pm
This is the second week of my sabbatical and already I have a sinking feeling that I’m not accomplishing enough.
September 10, 2008 - 5:42am
The patch of woods outside my front door is in trouble. After we moved into our neighborhood four years ago, my husband and I, along with several other community members lobbied hard for an elementary school to serve our growing population. Be careful what you wish for, I guess. Last spring the school district announced plans to build a new elementary school in our community, but we learned that the playing field for the school will cut right through our favorite patch of forest.
September 9, 2008 - 10:03pm
A new correspondent writes: I have a question about college teaching as a second career. Most of the advice I've seen is aimed at twenty-something's finishing grad school. I am a few months shy of my 50th birthday and live in the DC metro area. I started graduate school straight out of college and was on my way to finishing my PhD in American History when I was side-tracked: I took a "real" job in an area unrelated to my degree. I kept plugging away at it though, and finally finished my doctorate in 1999, twelve years after leaving school.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Most

  • Viewed
  • Commented
  • Past:
  • Day
  • Week
  • Month
  • Year
Loading results...
Back to Top