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September 9, 2010
September 6th was the 150th birthday of writer, philosopher and political activist Jane Addams --the first woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize and the founder of Chicago’s Hull House. I decided to require my honors students to meet me for class this week at the Hull House museum, where a block party birthday celebration was planned for the community (with free food...).
September 8, 2010
A new correspondent writes:I'm a librarian at a community college. The Library and Tutoring Center together make up the Learning Resources department and we're part of the Liberal Arts Division. The dean of our division has been in his position for (many) years. One of his primary goals since he arrived here has been the renovation of the library building to update it and reallocate much of the library's space to other support-services like the Tutoring Center, Reading Lab, and Language Lab. The construction has finally begun.
September 8, 2010
For women in the academy, one’s name is akin to a passport which under no circumstance must you tamper with. Your reputation as a scholar is attached to your name, which when subjected to a Google search, may yield only a few or a substantial number of hits depending on if it is correctly remembered or spelled. Unlike men, marriage pressures women to decide whether or not to make this changed civil status a separate “name reality” from their professional one. It is a tough choice to make.
September 8, 2010
Great dialogue this week in our discussion of the relationship between the for-profit and non-profit educational sectors. Thank you to everyone who has contributed.
September 8, 2010
Last week I read a publication newly released by the AAUP (American Association for University Professors) giving “Recommendations on partner accommodation and dual career appointments.In reading it, I started thinking about some of the many dual-academic couples I know.
September 7, 2010
The first week of classes has a charm all its own. Students are everywhere, professors are rested and ready, nobody’s behind yet, parking is a nightmare of Biblical proportions, a few professors turn up missing at the last minute, and everyone -- everyone -- complains about the bookstore.It’s the same every year. It’s actually sort of reassuring.I can count on hearing certain things, and have already gone through most of the list for this year:“Books are too expensive!” Yes, they are.“Can you believe what some students wear in public?” No, I can’t.
September 7, 2010
The comment posts and discussion in yesterday's blog post on "3 Ideas for For-Profit Communication" are fascinating. Thank you to everyone who has contributed so far to the discussion. (The debate and questions raised in the comments section are fascinating - and I'm particularly pleased that people from the for-profit and non-profit world are contributing).I was struck by what MiddleMgmt wrote:
September 7, 2010
Often, when I'm talking to someone of a certain age -- not so much students as parents of students -- about shifting American society in a more sustainable dimension, I get the definite impression that they think I'm trying to force us all back into a stone-age lifestyle. I'm not, and I wouldn't, and I don't want it for me or my kids, but the case that such a shift is orders of magnitude more drastic than anything that would be necessary takes longer to make than casual conversation can sustain.
September 7, 2010
Sometimes if you just wait long enough, everything falls into place.In terms of the ideas, that is what has happened in the Google/Verizon issue for this set of blogs. Intentionally I wanted to provide background for my opinion: that American society would benefit from strong regulatory presence in this area of “net neutrality.” In the meantime a couple of important developments have occurred. In two New York Times stories last week evidence for my position emerged: the F.C. C.’s request for more comment and consumer pushback on Google.

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