Higher Education Webinars

Student Affairs and Technology

News, tips, and practical insights about technology for student affairs practitioners by Eric Stoller.

October 23, 2012 - 8:38pm
Last year’s NASPA Technology Conference was a turning point in Student Affairs. In many ways, the event was an experiment. NASPA had never put on a conference that was dedicated to technology. We didn’t know who would attend. Would #NASPAtech be too techie? Would social media dominate most of our conversations? There were a lot of questions.
October 14, 2012 - 8:22pm
Question: How can our office utilize social media to build community and enhance connections with students?
October 8, 2012 - 9:13pm
Last week, Cardale Jones, a first-year student at Ohio State University, posted the following to Twitter: "Why should we have to go to class if we came here to play FOOTBALL, we ain't come to play SCHOOL, classes are POINTLESS." A short time after Jones' post, that tweet (and his account on Twitter) were removed. Jones was also suspended for last weekend's game against Nebraska. According to the Ohio State student directory, he is currently in the University's Exploration Program with a major in Management and Industry Exploration. Like a lot of first-year students, Jones is still trying to figure out his academic major. It's a typical experience.
October 4, 2012 - 9:55pm
Last week was an audio/video adventure. Editing numerous interviews for a client, I became reacquainted with iMovie. In my pre-Mac days (translation: before I ate the metaphorical Apple), I would use whatever software I could find to edit videos. When I lived in St. Lucia in 2001, I used Adobe Premiere to edit/render videos. Oftentimes the power would go out, my laptop battery would run out of juice, and I would have to start over from scratch. It wasn't exactly a delightful editing process. However, I did learn quite a bit from those days of transferring clips from a tape-based camera to a computer and slogging my way through…I literally learned while on the go.
October 3, 2012 - 9:13pm
Posing questions on Twitter is a great way to discover things that you didn't know. For example, last week I tweeted out the following question: "Who are your favorite Deans of Students on Twitter?" In a short amount of time, I received a large number of responses. There will definitely be a post in the future that covers that particular question. However, for now, I wanted to share one of the responses that immediately caught my attention:
September 26, 2012 - 5:18pm
In December of 2010, I copied all of the text from every blog post that I had ever written for Inside Higher Ed into a text file. The document represented six months worth of entries and I recall that it took a fair amount of time to put it together. My goal in doing this exercise was to create a word cloud using Wordle.net that I could use as the header graphic for my "six month anniversary" post. The word cloud, with a few formatting tweaks (font, color, layout) in Wordle, turned out to be a nice summary of the most-used words in my posts. In fact, this particular word cloud has turned up all over the web as it seems to be a popular Student Affairs themed graphic.
September 20, 2012 - 8:12pm
What do Mary-Kate Olsen (Ashley too), Albert Einstein, Socrates, Abraham Lincoln and I have in common? We're all introverts as classified by the Myers Briggs personality type indicator (MBTI). According to the MBTI, introversion is a psychological preference that focuses on how an individual both expends and recharges their energy. Often mislabeled as being related to "shyness or reclusiveness," introversion doesn't necessarily dictate social behavior. There are shy extroverts and uber-social introverts. The major difference between extroverts and introverts is that extroverts tend to recharge during social situations while introverts do not. Introverts generally recharge by themselves and tend to be seen as being "reflective or reserved."
September 19, 2012 - 6:33pm
My mom majored in English…. I did not. Articulating jumbled packages of thoughts into a coherent story ... sometimes I struggle with that. When I stroll through myriad posts within the student affairs blogosphere, I am consistently impressed with the level of thoughtfulness, vulnerability, forward-thinking, and love. Love for the profession, care for colleagues both near and far… it’s energizing to read so many wonderful posts. There are so many great writers within the student affairs profession.
September 12, 2012 - 4:06pm
Math, writing, science, history and a variety of additional topics are generally included in the core curricula for higher education institutions. They are the building blocks of education. Standards that have evolved over time. We tend to acknowledge their importance. Ideally, students will achieve a baseline of knowledge and skills that form the foundations of their educational experience.
September 4, 2012 - 6:53pm
People are always asking me about which schools/department do social media "the best" in higher education. My usual response is that the professionals who are actively engaging via social media are spending less time talking about what they are doing and more time focusing on the needs of their campus. However, when it comes to social media and campus dining, there's one operation that is consistently using social media at a level that I can easily say is "the best."

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