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July 29, 2011
Rattlesnake Daddy: A Son’s Search for His Father, by Brent Spencer. The Backwaters Press (2011). $25.00 paper.***Here I’d like to return briefly to Rattlesnake Daddy, a memoir I reviewed a few days ago.
July 29, 2011
The University of Venus question of the month: What has been the highlight of your summer?Janni Aragon (Canada) Each year the highlight of my summer is the opportunity to work on my own projects. With my heavy teaching load, summer is the productive time of the year. And, at the same time, I just feel less rushed and enjoy time with my family. Summer means work splashed with lazy mornings. I am definitely a summer sort of person.
July 28, 2011
And the men aren’t.Sometimes just a few statistics can tell a story. Here’s a pair I found fascinating.Our students a year or less out of high school: 48% malesOur students as a whole: 38% malesThe skew gets progressively more pronounced as you move up the age scale. By the time you pass the early twenties, the students are overwhelmingly female. But the fresh-out-of-high-school group is almost even. And to the extent that I’ve seen national statistics, they pretty much tell the same story.
July 28, 2011
The bankruptcy of Borders and the closing of 400 stores provides an opportunity to think through some lessons for for higher ed? Are we immune from the fate of Borders? 3 Lessons:
July 28, 2011
The light is a bottle. A Coke bottle. A one-liter Coke bottle, to be precise. You know it's a Coke bottle because it has that trademarked narrow-waisted shape.
July 28, 2011
It is suspected that the 360 degrees in a circle may have originated from the 365 days in a year, as these 365 days bring us back to the day where we began, even as turning a geometric figure a full turn of 360 degrees returns the figure to where it started. This weekend the Jesuit order, which educated me, once again celebrates its founder.
July 28, 2011
 I don’t know what Aaron Swartz planned to do with the four million or so articles that he downloaded from JSTOR in violation of their terms of use, but it has made me wonder something: what would it cost for academic institutions to band together to buy the most used portion of JSTOR and set it free?  
July 28, 2011
Evidently, Larry Page of Google "once considered accepting goats as a legitimate form of payment from those seeking to buy Google ads in Uzbekistan" according to Evgeny Morozov who has a review of Steven Levy and Sia Vaidhyanathan's respective books on Google, "In the Plex" and "The Googlization of Everything" in the latest issue of The New Republic. Hence Morozov's conclusion that:
July 27, 2011
My favorite educators are the risk takers. The academic tech colleagues whom I most admire are the innovators. But with each passing day, I find myself (in big and little ways) becoming an edtech conservative. Perhaps this a natural course that most of us follow in our careers. We get a little more responsibility, and suddenly disruptive change doesn't look so appealing. We have more to lose, and are more accountable if things go badly.Still, I'm concerned enough about my own creeping edtech conservatism that I'm hoping to open a dialogue about this syndrome.

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