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February 12, 2012
I often wish there was a BOOK IT program for adults. I’m thinking of something different from the “grown-up” reading groups sponsored by talk show hosts where everyone, regardless of their interests, gathers to read the same chick-lit fare. And I’m definitely thinking of something different from traditional academic reading groups where copious notes and discussion questions are the norm. Both kinds of groups are well-meaning and there’s a place for them, to be sure. But really, I’m thinking of something with no guilt, no pressure, and no real agenda other than sharing and having fun.
February 12, 2012
Thank you Barbara Fister for your excellent review of David Weinberger's Too Big To Know, and to William Badke, Matthew Loving, Steven Paschold, Carl Hess, and Theron Snell for continuing the conversation about this terrific book.
February 12, 2012
On Friday, February 3rd, I was waiting for the economic update.  The jobs picture is a key indicator (even though it is considered a lagging indicator) of economic recovery, and I was looking to see if there were tangible signs that a real and perhaps more robust recovery was underway.  But even though I was tuned into the economy, my greatest attention was focused on the decision by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation decision to cut off funding for Planned Parenthood.
February 12, 2012
Ann Hassenpflug has an interesting article on the difficulty of teaching a graduate-level education class when parents whose childcare arrangements have fallen through bring their children to class. A lively and sometimes heated discussion follows in the comments.
February 10, 2012
Too Big to Know is a surprisingly small book (around 200 pages - you can sample an excerpt at The Atlantic) that covers a lot of ground, touching on issues of interest to anyone who wonders where knowledge is headed and what shape it is taking in this unstable era. The subtitle, written in the elevator pitch style that is so popular with publishers these days, provides a hint of what's inside: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room.
February 9, 2012
The busy life of a grad student is often spent juggling multiple responsibilities from school, work and personal life.  If you’re anything like me, you’re always finding yourself overcommitted to things and something has to drop to the wayside. One of my goals has been to better manage my time and set up boundaries with my commitments.  I’m not naturally a planner (big understatement!), but I’ve come to realize that if I’m not careful, things are just going to fall apart.
February 9, 2012
Academic conferences offer opportunities to test-run ideas before like-minded colleagues, to network, and to key into conversations within one’s discipline or specialization. For many academics, it’s an integral part of the job. In my University’s promotion system, considerable weight is given to presenting papers at academic conferences. Whether local, national or international, conferences provide venues for institutional promotion-- a chance to showcase research outputs from our little corner of the world.
February 9, 2012
Lately, I've had to become an expert at running projects outside of my expertise. I'm heading up a website project and a room A/V design projects, both subjects I know just enough about to be dangerous.
February 9, 2012
This Marketplace report brought me up short. It’s about Lloyd Blankfein, CEO of Goldman Sachs, endorsing gay marriage in New York.  The report notes that CEO’s of major banks aren’t generally known for taking positions on potentially divisive social issues.  

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