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Copyright Ruling + Online Video Platforms = Active Learning

Thanks to Tracy Mitrano for her synthesis and analysis of the new Copyright Office ruling that will allow us to legally crack DVDs owned by our institution's for fair use protected teaching activities. This is a welcome (and unusual) piece of good news, an important legal building block towards bringing some sanity to the efforts to incorporate video into teaching and learning.

July 27, 2010
 
 

Thanks to Tracy Mitrano for her synthesis and analysis of the new Copyright Office ruling that will allow us to legally crack DVDs owned by our institution's for fair use protected teaching activities. This is a welcome (and unusual) piece of good news, an important legal building block towards bringing some sanity to the efforts to incorporate video into teaching and learning.

On my own campus I"m deeply engrossed in a process to examine curricular media management systems. One feature of two of the vendors, Kaltura and ShareStream, is a lightweight Web based video editing system. This editing system, since it is paired with uploading / transcoding / and a video player, would make it much easier for students to create video mashups.

What I'm wondering is if the new Copyright Office ruling would allow the following scenario:

1. Would colleges and universities be able to load up full videos into the Kaltura or ShareStream system that students could then bring in to the editing system so they could create their own mashups?

2. Can we envision a route in which we move our library media collection from a streaming orientation towards one that allows new creations through mash-ups and editing?

3. The sticking point seems to be restrictions against streaming too many movies online, even if the institution owns the media and access to the video is protected by authentication (say through the LMS). I've always believed that the LMS is equivalent to the classroom, and if we can show a video in the physical classroom then we should be able to show it in the digital classroom. But can we extend the metaphor to mash-ups? Can we have the media ready to go for students to create, or does it needed to be re-uploaded (or re-enabled) on a class-by-class basis?

Watching video does not equal learning. Students need to do something with that video - be it a paper, a presentation, a formative assessment, or a mash-up. I'm hoping that a new class of media tools combined with some sanity in our copyright regulations will usher in some real change in how we learn and teach with media.

Do you think that media projects and video mashups will start to spread to more classes?

ps…If you have not read Lanny Arvan's piece on 7/27 on "Teaching With Blogs" then I highly recommend you take a few minutes to click on the link. Lanny is on the front-lines with experimenting with new teaching methods, and he raises many interesting questions (and provides some solutions), for open blog learning.

What I'm wondering is if any of the big blogging services like TypePad, Blogger, or Movable Type can be deeply integrated into LMS platforms to replace the built in blog tools? What I'd like is a toggle switch that says publish "openly" or "class only" - letting the student decide at the time of publishing where her post appears. Further, I want the blogging account to be owned by the student, and to stay persistent for the student's use once the class ends. Is anyone going in this direction?

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