Title

Journal 14

At a party, Dr. S, a Chinese neurologist practicing in the Midwest on exchange. Young, funny, has also worked in New York. Says family doctors aren’t aware of the latest technologies and still think there’s a possibility of MS when his MRI shows no brain plaque—what he calls “old CAT-Scan ideas.” “I can’t guarantee there’s not a single cell of cancer, though,” he laughs. He mocks hypochondriacal American university types: The cellist with the “tight” arm, the healthy administrator who calls him every two weeks and has had three MRIs so far.

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June 20, 2011
 

At a party, Dr. S, a Chinese neurologist practicing in the Midwest on exchange. Young, funny, has also worked in New York. Says family doctors aren’t aware of the latest technologies and still think there’s a possibility of MS when his MRI shows no brain plaque—what he calls “old CAT-Scan ideas.” “I can’t guarantee there’s not a single cell of cancer, though,” he laughs. He mocks hypochondriacal American university types: The cellist with the “tight” arm, the healthy administrator who calls him every two weeks and has had three MRIs so far. “Okay, okay, we give you another one,” he says, flipping his hand dismissively and laughing. But farmers are just the opposite, he says, suddenly serious. He wishes they’d come in before it’s too late.

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