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April 14, 2009 - 8:16am
Little-known until now, the Tibetan Book of the Adjunct: Liberation Through Understanding in the Between provides spiritual guidance to those in the process of losing their jobs, due to ACT requirements being lowered by the college so students can be pushed through the system more rapidly and cheaply. It’s a terrifying time of transition between the state of employment and the darkness of food stamps for those not in the tenure stream, and after calling the adjunct by name, you should orient her as follows:
April 13, 2009 - 11:26pm
I read aloud in my classes a lot. In children’s lit, I explain that I want my students to experience the text as the child audience often does — as an oral performance. In my Victorian literature classes, I remind my students that many Victorian novels were family read-alouds, and I read short passages frequently to force us all to slow down, to pay attention to the details of scene-setting and dialogue that, reading for plot, we may skim through.
April 13, 2009 - 11:18pm
If I could give a single piece of advice to the new administrators out there, it would be to pay less attention to what you decide, and more to who gets to decide. And remember that speed kills. It seems like a simple enough point, but it took me years to figure out. Some of that had to do with context, but some of it was a function of visibility.
April 13, 2009 - 2:59pm
This year's winner of the Pritzker architecture prize, Peter Zumthor, has a rare ability to convey in words the spirit of buildings.
April 13, 2009 - 2:34pm
I'm fried. Oronte's fried. Anybody else getting near the end of their tether? (C'mon now. 'Fess up!) What is it about April?
April 12, 2009 - 9:34pm
Back in high school, every Sunday night was torture. That was when the homework for the weekend that I'd been putting off finally couldn't be put off any more. I finally had to face it. The same held true in college, and, weirdly enough, even in grad school. Then in my faculty days, Sunday nights were usually devoted to class prep and/or grading, so the dynamic didn't really change.
April 12, 2009 - 8:11pm
When the climate-change-is-hooey-and-will-kill-the-only-economy-we've-got crowd starts turning to Denmark for its authoritative sources, you know they're desperate. That's even more true of the taxes-are-evil bloviators. As regards taxes, the Danes pay some of the highest rates in the world. They're not complaining, perhaps because they get good value in return for their money. (Hmmm ... getting good value is more important than whether your outlay is "taxes" or "consumption". How radical!)
April 11, 2009 - 1:09am
Even after years of observing the phenomenon, I have no explanation. Obviously, one might think that on a rainy Monday morning, in the slump after midterms, fewer people would be walking on campus because fewer might be expected to go to classes. Or that on fine spring afternoons many would be out and about, even if they were walking past their classrooms, bound for trysts and other assignations. Actually, there’s no way to predict.
April 9, 2009 - 9:12pm
I mentioned a few days ago that Kay McClenney's point about shortening the remediation death march was worth a post in itself. Here goes...
April 8, 2009 - 11:06pm
Last night a former student took over my kitchen, riffling through my cabinets, grabbing spices -- chopping, simmering, zesting, and improvising with random vegetables and the remains of an ancient bag of rice. I did buy a nice piece of steak but otherwise I took him at his word that he could make a fantastic meal out of whatever we had on hand. And he did.

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