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October 2, 2011
Some readers will interpret Chad Harbach's The Art of Fielding as a book about baseball, others as a book about fathers and daughters, taboo love affairs, or the intensity of male friendship. I see The Art of Fielding as one of our great campus novels.
October 2, 2011
I have two comments to make about today's New York Times article regarding the United States Post Office's (USPO) challenge to remain relevant. According to the article, USPO's deficient is large and growing. The alleged problem is "the Internet," with a focus on email verses "stamped" mail. My first comment is academic, the second is administrative.
October 2, 2011
Like so many others, I was saddened and discouraged to read of the death of Jamey Rodemeyer, yet another promising teenager who was apparently goaded into suicide by ignorant bullies.
September 30, 2011
Earlier this week, I saw part of the premiere of the new program, Terra Nova. It started on a world that reminded me of Blade Runner (but without the rain, and the sheep) but soon shifted to a kind of Jurassic Park in reverse (the dinosaurs are on the outside of the fence). I thought it might be worth watching on the basis that two of the producers are Rene Echevarria and Brannon Braga (Star Trek TNG, The 4400), but I notice that they're only two out of a whole lot of producers. Could be good, could easily be too many cooks. We'll see.
September 29, 2011
A full software bake-off, one that involves an in-depth comparison and review of competing software platforms and and solutions from a variety of vendors, is the gold standard for software selection. This bake-off should commence following the development of a full set of requirements and use-case examples, so that the products can be evaluated and scored against a rubric. Bake-offs usually commence from an industry scan, progress to webinars, elevate to face-to-face demos, and culminate in pilot projects.
September 29, 2011
-- This week a student reminded me of a side of college I sometimes forget. He’s openly gay, and his mannerisms fit the stereotype pretty conspicuously. He mentioned that high school -- just last year -- was sheer hell for him, with his always being subjected to, as he put it, “faggot this and faggot that.” Having been here for a year, he said that he never hears that here. Now that he feels safe, he’s able to stop always looking over his shoulder, and his grades have improved dramatically.
September 29, 2011
I remember being part of a meeting many years ago where the term “STEM” (to describe the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math and/or Medicine) was used lightly, under the assumption that everyone knew what it meant. Although I am technically not from a “STEM” discipline, since I am an economist, I teach in a math department, so was familiar with the term.
September 29, 2011
September's UVenus question comes to us from Meg Palladino -- What is your favorite proverb or saying, and why?Afshan Jafar (US) My favorite proverb: "He teaches ill, who teaches all." As a teacher, I love the wisdom of this proverb: a good teacher leaves some room for students to make their own discoveries and arrive at their own conclusions instead of spoon-feeding all the answers to them.
September 29, 2011
In today's IHE article on the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Aid Committee's survey of higher education regarding regulation, the conclusion suggests that higher education may perceive the burden of regulation to be greater than it actually is. Maybe so, I am not an expert on the whole thing. But I do know something about the last decade's file sharing debacle. My experience based on that example makes me skeptical.The Higher Education Opportunity Act's peer to peer file sharing provisions are discriminatory toward higher education.

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