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January 13, 2011
A familiar truism about academia is that the battles are so big because the stakes are so small. Academics will fight over anything, from journal rankings (and which journals “count”), which department can use the word "rhetoric" in course titles, to who gets the credit for a big idea. For the most part, I've kept out of such battles because I need my energy for other things.
January 12, 2011
Last week Inside Higher Ed published an anonymous piece by someone who has decided to leave academia entitled, "Because."
January 12, 2011
Like many colleges, mine requires a few days each year for faculty and staff professional development. They’re tolerated somewhat grudgingly on all sides, which I think is about right.
January 12, 2011
Why am I interested in engaging with (talking to, spending time with, breaking bread with etc.) people (leadership, faculty, administrators) who work for for-profit EDU institutions?8 Reasons:
January 12, 2011
This is the first in a series of posts from our archives. We will be sharing posts that we published prior to partnering with Inside Higher Ed in July 2010. Why Do We Write? was originally published at http://uvenus.org on 4.12.2010.
January 12, 2011
In 2010, the 13th most-popular post on my personal blog was "Student Affairs + Jobs + RSS + Email." In the post, I outline how you can use RSS feeds to have job postings delivered to your RSS reader. Several student affairs associations and job posting sites offer RSS feeds for their position announcements.
January 11, 2011
I’m on the horns of a dilemma here, and I’m hoping that crowdsourcing the problem might lead to a sustainable solution. Wise and worldly readers, I’m counting on you!Like many colleges, my college's faculty does not reflect the demographics of either its students or its community. Bluntly, it's a lot whiter. The disparity is largest on the faculty side.
January 11, 2011
When I was in elementary school I hated school recess. A list with a rotating schedule assigned each classroom to an official “area” of the mostly cement playground where we had to stay, as a class, and play the prescribed game for that arena. For me, recess came with those classic uncomfortable aspects: being picked for a team (last), not knowing how to play the game, not having the skills for playing the game (I could not throw a ball; neither did I want to).
January 11, 2011
"Google Inc. is talking with educational-software companies to help build a marketplace for online learning programs, an industry whose value may approach $5 billion this year."--From The Boston Globe, 12/29/10"Google Apps Marketplace helps students’ minds thrive in the cloud"
January 11, 2011
After two decades in the academe, I have purposely avoided being nominated to any administrative position. This came from an earlier conviction that I would rather be a serious scholar than a paper-pushing bureaucrat. Because the pool of would-be university administrators seems to draw disproportionately from a handful of PhD holders, I thought it was a great disservice to have such expensive education wasted on the banality of managing. Besides, being tied to a desk job is the antithesis of my desire to travel abroad.

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