Higher Education Webinars

The World View

A blog from the Center for International Higher Education

December 13, 2011 - 11:04am
Peru is one of the last countries in South America to implement an accreditation program for higher education.  And the experience has been different than elsewhere. 
November 29, 2011 - 8:24am
On November 11-12, the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) held a prominent conference in Delhi on Strategies for Expansion of Indian Higher Education. Listening to the discussions there (and at a very successful entrepreneurial private university near Delhi) made for a sharp contrast with the discussions I heard when visiting Indian public universities. Each side has its own strong storyline or worldview about higher education and appropriate policy for it. Simplifying on both ends, we can portray one side’s vision as close to Wall Street, the other’s to Occupy Wall Street.
November 22, 2011 - 8:24pm
In early October 2011 the seminar, “Network for Organizations Managing Higher Education, Research and Capacity Building Programs for Developing Countries” was held in Norway to discuss issues of harmonization under the theme of “Coordination and Harmonization of International Aid Programs.” The network is a group of European organizations committed to developing higher education and capacity building in developing countries with the aim of harmonizing and coordinating the programs they implement.
November 14, 2011 - 8:37pm
The good news is that at several public universities in Brazil, students are being allowed space in the curriculum to add classes of their own choosing to the pre-defined program of study.  Okay, most of these choices must be made within their area of study.  But there is also an allowance to choose a certain number of credits from any degree program offered at the university.  That’s where the good news ends
November 9, 2011 - 9:33pm
Recent research concerning higher education in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, China, India) reflects as many differences as there are in economic models and cultures But one similarity among these emerging economic powerhouses is the urgent need to improve academic culture. All four countries aspire to being recognized as home to world-class research-focused universities, but this class of institution requires a vibrant, merit-based academic culture.
November 2, 2011 - 2:55pm
A few nights ago I was sitting at the dinner table with colleagues from Brazil trying to explain the US higher education system.  You never realize how complicated US higher education is until you try to explain it to someone. What does it mean to be a private university in the US? 
October 26, 2011 - 3:00am
Recent events in Chile have again drawn attention to student movements. Although current political activity is less dramatic in Argentina, the debate about activism at public universities in the media and public opinion has been sparked as a result of El Estudiante (The Student), a recently released independent Argentine film.
October 18, 2011 - 8:15am
The fall in enrolment levels in Poland expected for 2025 is the highest in Europe, and comparable in the OECD area only to Korea and Japan (OECD volume on Higher Education to 2030). In one scenario that Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin presents, enrolments in 2025 are expected to fall to 55% of the 2005 levels or dwindle by almost one million students. In Europe only Spain and Germany can expect decreases of significant magnitude by 2025 (Spain by 342.000 and Germany by 209.000).
October 12, 2011 - 9:46am
The academic marketplace is expected to be democratic and it is therefore assumed that women should be represented in continuously increasing numbers. But although research has shown a clear trend of women gaining improved access to academic positions for some decades, barriers to equality are still at play.
October 4, 2011 - 9:31am
Accreditation is about as ambiguous a measure as anyone could imagine. Yet, being “accredited” has tremendous value in the academic world. In the United States, it is a benchmark that suggests that a “certain” standard has been met. But that benchmark covers many very different kinds of institutions with different missions, resources, infrastructure, and constituents. We are invariably awarding the same level of validation to apples, oranges, bananas, kumquats, and lingonberries.


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