Effort launches to boost low-income enrollment at top colleges


A group of 30 top colleges and universities wants to enroll more low-income students, but critics question whether the focus should be elsewhere.

High school graduates to drop in number and be increasingly diverse

High school graduates are projected to come from increasingly diverse backgrounds, even as overall levels plateau -- posing a challenge for colleges and universities.

Trinity College in Connecticut sells building and changes enrollment strategy


Trinity of Connecticut moves away from year-after-year freshmen enrollment gains and a controversial real estate purchase, aiming to be better and more diverse at a smaller size.

Prominent figures in academe and higher ed groups speak out about election aftermath


Lawrence Summers disavows term "political correctness"; Columbia president says Trump victory challenges "central idea of a university"; Jewish historians call for support for immigrants; and more.

Reuters investigates 'special relationship' between U.S. admissions officers and Chinese education company accused of fraud

A Reuters investigation details how a Chinese company accused by multiple ex-employees of application fraud "bought access" to U.S. admissions officers.

Chicago State struggles under questions of enrollment, finance, leadership


“I just wonder how long we can go,” one faculty member at the financially struggling public university says.

More colleges drop application fees for low-income students


City U of New York, Bowdoin and Trinity of Connecticut all move this month to drop the charges for low-income applicants.

SUNY removes question on criminal convictions from application

Sixty-four-campus system will no longer ask applicants to declare prior felony convictions. After admission, those seeking housing or certain kinds of training or experiences will be asked.

NACAC survey shows that most colleges admit most applicants


Data from admissions group show that, despite all the hype about a few elite colleges that admit a small share of applicants, most institutions say yes to most of those who apply.

Smith College students protest two leaked faculty letters

Social work professors told administrators that they were letting students make unfair accusations and admitting unqualified students. Then someone forwarded the professors' letters to students. UPDATE: Dean responds.


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