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Jury convicts parents in admissions scandal case

Two wealthy fathers found to have bribed their children into college.

The Marist list reveals what the freshmen know

What do you need to know about this year's freshmen? Consult the list.

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Ohio State issues report on abuse of scores of former students by doctor

Report finds that university employees knew about the abuse by a doctor and failed to act.

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Rice Will Start Semester Online

Rice University will start the fall semester online for two weeks, Provost Reginald DesRoches announced Thursday.

DesRoches said, "Much remains to be learned about the Delta variant and we need to pay close attention to the current surge that is especially pronounced in Texas. We need time to test and assess the prevalence of COVID-19 in the Rice community and its related health outcomes, and to implement any appropriate risk mitigation actions, keeping in mind the effectiveness of vaccination in preventing serious illness."

In a separate letter, Bridget Gorman, dean of undergraduates, said students who live in the Houston area should delay their return to campus. She also announced that "if you are currently living on campus this semester but wish to move off campus because of the complexities surrounding the COVID circumstances, housing and dining will waive the fees for breaking the housing contract in the following ways. Students that do not move on campus at all will receive a full refund for room and board."

Gorman added, "I am sure that reading this, you feel a sense of disappointment that we find ourselves in this situation -- I know that I do. But, as much as our vision for our fall start is shifting, I remain optimistic that these changes reflect a relatively short-term opportunity to pause-and-reset, rather than permanent alterations to how life on campus will be this semester."

 

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Nebraska Regents Shoot Down Anti-Critical Race Theory Proposal

The Board of Regents for the University of Nebraska system on Friday voted down a resolution opposing the "imposition" of critical race theory on the curriculum. The resolution, backed by the state's Republican governor, Pete Ricketts, was proposed by Regent Jim Pillen, a Republican who is running to succeed term-limited Ricketts as governor. The regents' vote -- which followed hours of public comments and discussion -- was 3-5, with an additional four student egents all opposing the resolution. For a full story on the vote, read Inside Higher Ed Monday.

 

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Biden's budget calls for funding increases to Pell, HBCUs and more

Increases for federal Pell Grants, minority-serving institutions and more. Here's what's in President Biden's budget for higher education.

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James Kvaal Nominated for Under Secretary of Education

President Biden on Friday nominated James Kvaal to be under secretary of education. In that role, he is expected to focus on higher education. Kvaal is the president of the Institute for College Access & Success, which advocates on behalf of students for access, affordability and equity in higher education. He previously served as the deputy domestic policy adviser in the Obama-Biden White House, where he worked on issues related to economic opportunity and education. His work on higher education included initiatives to make college tuition more affordable, protect students from unaffordable loans and help more students graduate from college.

A full story will appear on Monday.

 

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Cal State taps Fresno president Joseph I. Castro to be system's next chancellor

Fresno State president Joseph I. Castro will lead the 482,000-student system starting in January, taking over for Chancellor Timothy P. White, who delayed retirement amid the pandemic.

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ICE: New International Students Can't Take Only Online Courses

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued new guidance today saying new international students -- unlike current international students -- will not be able to travel to the U.S. to take an entirely online course of study.

The guidance states that students will not be penalized, however, if their institutions switch from in-person or hybrid to online mode midterm due to the pandemic.

“Nonimmigrant students pursuing studies in the United States for the fall 2020 school term may remain in the United States even if their educational institution switches to a hybrid program or to fully online instruction,” an FAQ from ICE says. “The students will maintain their nonimmigrant status in this scenario and would not be subject to initiation of removal proceedings based on their online studies.”

More than 20 universities and 20 states filed various lawsuits to block an ICE directive that would have prohibited current international students from taking all their courses online. While the government agreed to rescind that directive in response to litigation, the rescission left the fate of new international students unclear. Higher education groups have advocated for the ability for new international students to get visas to come to the U.S. to start their college programs regardless of whether their institutions plan on an in-person, hybrid or online-only modality for fall.

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MacMurray College Closing at End of Semester

MacMurray College, a 174-year-old liberal arts institution in Jacksonville, Ill., will close at the end of the spring semester, the college announced Friday.

The small private college’s board decided it had no viable financial path for the future. Leaders cited declining enrollment, rising costs and an endowment they called insufficient.

MacMurray’s board attempted to find new sources of capital and to explore financial scenarios for more than a year. The college had also been laying plans to build professional degree programs and educate more nontraditional students.

“However, despite our best efforts, we were unable to secure the capital to fund a viable path forward,” the board’s chair, Charles O’Connell, said in a statement. “We deeply regret this decision and are sorry for the disruption and disappointment it will have for everyone in the Mac Family.”

O’Connell also called closing the only responsible option.

The new coronavirus and the economic pain it's causing across the country were not the main driver behind the closure, O’Connell added.

MacMurray will work with accreditors to transition students to seven nearby colleges and universities for the fall semester. It will also route incoming freshmen and transfer students to other institutions.

The college enrolls more than 500 full-time students. It employs 101 full-time workers. Most employees will be terminated effective May 25. Some may remain to help with closure efforts.

No decision has been made about the college’s commencement, scheduled for May 9.

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