Breaking News

Michigan State, Nassar survivors agree to $500 million settlement

University will pay $425 million to current plaintiffs, set aside $75 million for future.

Hobart President Resigns After Plagiarism Allegations

The president of Hobart and William Smith Colleges resigned Friday, just weeks after the college started investigating allegations that he plagiarized his 2004 dissertation.

An anonymous email dated March 21 alleged several instances of plagiarism in the dissertation, which Gregory J. Vincent wrote to receive his doctorate in higher education from the University of Pennsylvania. Leaders at Hobart and William Smith Colleges then started investigating the matter.

On Friday, Vincent told trustees he was resigning. He said in a statement that he believed in the path Hobart and William Smith had been following under his leadership.

“Given the anonymous allegations leveled against my scholarship, however, and the distraction they have caused, I believe this is the best decision for the colleges and for me,” Vincent said. “My primary concern is to avoid any further stress to the campus community. I remain grateful for the partnership of the community and wish the colleges well.”

The college will conduct a national search for a replacement. In the meantime, Pat McGuire, professor emeritus of economics, will serve as interim president.

Ad keywords: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Mount Ida College to Close, With Campus Going to UMass

Graphic for Inside Higher Ed Events, part of the 2018 Leadership Series: "Joining Forces: Merger and Collaboration Strategies." Presenting sponsor Strada Education Network. April 19, Washington, DC. Register now.Mount Ida College announced Friday that it will shut down and its campus will become part of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Students in good standing will be eligible for automatic admission to the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, where they have been assured they can finish their degrees.

Mount Ida has been struggling financially and looking for new options. In February it announced discussions with Lasell College about a possible merger. But those discussions ended last month.

The discussions came at a time when a number of colleges are considering mergers and some have closed. Small private colleges without substantial endowments have been particularly challenged by the current economy.

A statement from the college's board said, "The financial situation facing small private colleges nationwide is a difficult one. Despite extraordinary growth and progress over the last several years, Mount Ida, like its peers, is vulnerable to the realities of having limited resources. As a result, we have considered multiple options to secure the strongest possible long-term future for our students."

Editorial Tags: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Trump Picks Jon Parrish Peede to Lead NEH

Photo of Jon Parrish PeedePresident Trump on Friday nominated Jon Parrish Peede (right) to become chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Peede has worked at the NEH since April 2017, serving as senior deputy chairman. Since William D. Adams, an appointee of President Obama, stepped down as chairman in May, Peede has effectively been the senior person at the NEH.

In his first two budget proposals, Trump proposed eliminating the NEH, but Congress has rebuffed him.

Peede has experience in the humanities publishing world. He has served as publisher of Virginia Quarterly Review, at the University of Virginia; literature grants director at the National Endowment for the Arts; director of communications at Millsaps College; and an editor at Mercer University Press.

The National Humanities Alliance published an interview with Peede in October. In that interview, Peede said that he viewed the NEH as “a catalytic funder” that can encourage “institutional buy-in” and help start “new areas of the humanities.”

Editorial Tags: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Concordia Alabama, a historically black college, announces that it will shut down operations

Section: 

Concordia in Alabama, the only Lutheran HBCU, will end operations. It is second small religious college to announce closure in a week.

Grand Canyon U tries again to become a nonprofit

Grand Canyon University announces another attempt at converting from a publicly traded for-profit to a nonprofit.

Appeals Court Rejects Trump's Travel Ban

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled Dec. 22 that the latest version of President Trump's travel ban illegally exceeds presidential authority. The unanimous ruling is another victory for critics of the travel ban, many of them educators concerned about international students and researchers. But the ruling will not have an immediate impact. The U.S. Supreme Court this month allowed the ban to go into effect, pending its own possible review of the ban. The Supreme Court asked federal appeals courts -- including the Ninth Circuit -- to rule on cases "with appropriate dispatch" to allow for a Supreme Court review.

The current version of the ban applies to everyone from Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. While students and researchers from these countries make up a small share of those who come to American colleges and universities, academic groups have strongly opposed the ban and its previous versions, arguing that international students and scholars already face security reviews before being granted visas and should not be excluded just because of their country of origin. Higher education groups also say that the ban is viewed in many other countries as a sign that the U.S. government is hostile to those from Muslim-majority nations.

Friday's ruling came in a case brought by the State of Hawaii. Many leading colleges from all over the United States filed briefs backing the state's challenge. The state's argument, noted by the court, includes the interest of colleges and universities in the state in recruiting international students. The state says that laws governing the issuing of visas should permit continued travel by those from the countries in the ban, provided they are granted visas through normal processes.

Ad keywords: 
Editorial Tags: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Spanier Sentenced to Two Months in Jail

Graham Spanier, former president of Pennsylvania State University, was sentenced Friday to four months to one year of jail time, but was told he could serve two months in jail to be followed by two months of house arrest, The Centre Daily Times reported. The sentence was for child endangerment, in which he was convicted of failing to notify authorities when he learned that Jerry Sandusky was likely sexually assaulting children, and was using his then position as an assistant football coach to do so.

Spanier's lawyers, citing his health issues and contributions to society made in his career, had asked for him to be spared jail time, but prosecutors said jail time was appropriate. Spanier is expected to appeal his conviction.

Ad keywords: 
Editorial Tags: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Yale Will Take Calhoun Name Off Residential College

Yale University announced Saturday that it will remove the name of John C. Calhoun (at right) from one of its residential colleges. "The decision to change a college’s name is not one we take lightly, but John C. Calhoun’s legacy as a white supremacist and a national leader who passionately promoted slavery as a 'positive good' fundamentally conflicts with Yale’s mission and values," said a letter released by Peter Salovey, the president. Calhoun is notorious in American history for his effectiveness in protecting slavery and promoting bigoted ideas about black people in the era prior to the Civil War.

Saturday's announcement marks the end of decades of debate at Yale over Calhoun, an alumnus. Last year, Yale announced that it would keep the Calhoun name on the residential college, and that doing so was part of the commitment of the college to acknowledging and teaching the history of the institution's connections with slavery. The decision led to protests and considerable condemnation. A few months later, Yale announced it would reconsider its decision, and that it would first create a system for evaluating requests for such name changes. That panel was then convened, as was another to consider whether the Calhoun name should be removed. On Saturday, Yale's board made a final decision on the matter.

Salovey's letter noted that Calhoun was different from others in history who may be honored at Yale or elsewhere. "This principal legacy of Calhoun -- and the indelible imprint he has left on American history -- conflicts fundamentally with the values Yale has long championed. Unlike other namesakes on our campus, he distinguished himself not in spite of these views but because of them. Although it is not clear exactly how Calhoun’s pro-slavery and racist views figured in the 1931 naming decision, depictions in the college celebrating plantation life and the 'Old South' suggest that Calhoun was honored not simply as a statesman and political theorist but in full contemplation of his unique place in the history of slavery," Salovey's letter said.

He added, "In making this change, we must be vigilant not to erase the past. To that end, we will not remove symbols of Calhoun from elsewhere on our campus, and we will develop a plan to memorialize the fact that Calhoun was a residential college name for 86 years. Furthermore, alumni of the college may continue to associate themselves with the name Calhoun College."

Or they may adopt the new name for the residential college, which will honor Grace Murray Hopper (right), a pioneer in computing who earned a master's degree and doctorate from Yale in the 1930s. She had a long career in the U.S. Navy, retiring with the rank of rear admiral.

Editorial Tags: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 

Judge Blocks Entry Ban, Visas Restored

The U.S. Department of State has restored the validity of visas from individuals from seven countries whose nationals were barred from entering the United States under a Jan. 27 executive order signed by President Trump. The State Department's move follows a federal judge's decision Friday night to temporarily block the enforcement of that order nationwide.

The New York Times reported that Judge James Robart, of the Federal District Court for the Western District of Washington, temporarily barred the enforcement of the 90-day entry ban on nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. On Saturday morning the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said it was suspending all actions to implement the immigration order, several news outlets reported.

In accordance with the order, the State Department has restored the validity of visas from the seven countries, which it had provisionally revoked in response to Trump’s executive order.

“We have reversed the provisional revocation of visas under Executive Order 13769,” a State Department official told Inside Higher Ed. “Those individuals with visas that were not physically canceled may now travel if the visa is otherwise valid.”

Trump’s executive order has been widely condemned by civil rights groups as a pretext for banning the entry of Muslims, and by education groups and university leaders who see it as undermining key higher education values of inclusion, mobility and internationalism, and as preventing the travel by talented students and scholars to their campuses. Numerous students and scholars from the affected countries who happened to be abroad at the time the order was signed have been unable to re-enter the U.S. Under the terms of the order, those already in the U.S. did not have to leave, but they would be unable to re-enter the country if they left, in effect preventing them from engaging in any personal or professional international travel.

The White House has pledged to contest Robart’s ruling. “At the earliest possible time, the Department of Justice intends to file an emergency stay of this outrageous order and defend the executive order of the president, which we believe is lawful and appropriate,” the White House said in a statement Friday.

An updated statement from the White House deleted the word “outrageous,” but Trump did not hold back his outrage on Twitter, saying, “The opinion of this so-called judge, which essentially takes law-enforcement away from our country, is ridiculous and will be overturned!” Trump has justified the executive order as intended to keep terrorists out of the United States.

Editorial Tags: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Breaking News
Back to Top