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The Marist list reveals what the freshmen know

What do you need to know about this year's freshmen? Consult the list.

Ohio State issues report on abuse of scores of former students by doctor

Report finds that university employees knew about the abuse by a doctor and failed to act.

Cal State taps Fresno president Joseph I. Castro to be system's next chancellor

Fresno State president Joseph I. Castro will lead the 482,000-student system starting in January, taking over for Chancellor Timothy P. White, who delayed retirement amid the pandemic.

ICE: New International Students Can't Take Only Online Courses

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued new guidance today saying new international students -- unlike current international students -- will not be able to travel to the U.S. to take an entirely online course of study.

The guidance states that students will not be penalized, however, if their institutions switch from in-person or hybrid to online mode midterm due to the pandemic.

“Nonimmigrant students pursuing studies in the United States for the fall 2020 school term may remain in the United States even if their educational institution switches to a hybrid program or to fully online instruction,” an FAQ from ICE says. “The students will maintain their nonimmigrant status in this scenario and would not be subject to initiation of removal proceedings based on their online studies.”

More than 20 universities and 20 states filed various lawsuits to block an ICE directive that would have prohibited current international students from taking all their courses online. While the government agreed to rescind that directive in response to litigation, the rescission left the fate of new international students unclear. Higher education groups have advocated for the ability for new international students to get visas to come to the U.S. to start their college programs regardless of whether their institutions plan on an in-person, hybrid or online-only modality for fall.

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MacMurray College Closing at End of Semester

MacMurray College, a 174-year-old liberal arts institution in Jacksonville, Ill., will close at the end of the spring semester, the college announced Friday.

The small private college’s board decided it had no viable financial path for the future. Leaders cited declining enrollment, rising costs and an endowment they called insufficient.

MacMurray’s board attempted to find new sources of capital and to explore financial scenarios for more than a year. The college had also been laying plans to build professional degree programs and educate more nontraditional students.

“However, despite our best efforts, we were unable to secure the capital to fund a viable path forward,” the board’s chair, Charles O’Connell, said in a statement. “We deeply regret this decision and are sorry for the disruption and disappointment it will have for everyone in the Mac Family.”

O’Connell also called closing the only responsible option.

The new coronavirus and the economic pain it's causing across the country were not the main driver behind the closure, O’Connell added.

MacMurray will work with accreditors to transition students to seven nearby colleges and universities for the fall semester. It will also route incoming freshmen and transfer students to other institutions.

The college enrolls more than 500 full-time students. It employs 101 full-time workers. Most employees will be terminated effective May 25. Some may remain to help with closure efforts.

No decision has been made about the college’s commencement, scheduled for May 9.

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Appeals Court: Judge Overstepped in Ordering Michigan President to Testify

A federal judge overstepped his authority when he tried to force the University of Michigan president to appear in court for a settlement conference in a sexual assault lawsuit, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled on Friday.

Arthur Tarnow, the federal district judge, had insisted that Michigan's president, Mark Schlissel, appear in court to explain the university's sexual assault policies and procedures for adjudicating sexual misconduct, a highly unusual legal move.

But in the unanimous ruling from the panel of three judges, they said Tarnow's reasoning was not valid.

"The university offered to send someone with full settlement authority," the ruling stated. "Thus, the district judge abused his discretion when he ordered a specific high-ranking state official to serve as a party's representative."

The lawsuit is still ongoing.

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Huge Budget Cut for the University of Alaska

Mike Dunleavy, Alaska's Republican governor, used a veto on Friday to strip $130 million from the University of Alaska system's operating budget, the Anchorage Daily News reported. The slashing follows a $5 million reduction by the Legislature, and would be a roughly 40-percent cut to the system's total state support.

The Legislature could override Dunleavy's veto. But that appears unlikely, the newspaper reported. The governor made the cut largely to free up funding for Alaska's Permanent Fund, a dividend the state pays to its residents based on oil revenue.

“We can’t continue to be all things for all people,” Dunleavy said in a news conference Friday.

The cuts would be devastating to the system, said Jim Johnsen, its president. Roughly 40 percent of the system's budget comes from the state, which already has slashed its annual contribution by $50 million since 2014.

"Make no mistake, the university cannot absorb an additional, substantial reduction in state general funds without abruptly halting numerous student career pathways mid-stream, eliminating services or shutting down community campuses or universities," Johnsen wrote in a recently published opinion piece. "An additional reduction of even $10 million -- on top of the $51 million in cuts we’ve already taken -- will mean the discontinuation of programs and services with little or no notice, and that in turn will have ripple effects, damaging UA’s ability to generate revenue and causing even greater harm across the state."

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Chapel Hill Chancellor to Step Down After Moving Pieces From Confederate Monument Site

The chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will leave her position at the end of the academic year, she said Monday in a letter in which she also announced that she has authorized the removal of the base and commemorative plaques from the site of the felled Silent Sam Confederate monument that has roiled the campus and the UNC system.

Carol L. Folt (at right) emphasized safety in her decision to remove the base and plaques from the site of the statue, which protestors tore down in August. Keeping the remaining parts of the monument on campus created a continuing threat to personal safety, community well-being and the university’s ability to provide a stable educational environment, she wrote in a letter posted to the university’s news site.

“While I recognize that some may not agree with my decision to remove the base and tablets now, I am confident this is the right one for our community -- one that will promote public safety, enable us to begin the healing process and renew our focus on our great mission,” Folt wrote.

Folt and Chapel Hill’s campus board had backed a plan to build a history center to house the monument and detail the history of race at the university. But the UNC Board of Governors rejected that plan in December.

The debate over the statue's future was not resolved when it was knocked down by protesters. Some called for the statue to be restored to its site. The state's Republican former governor, Pat McCrory, had signed a law to prevent relocating or removing monuments on public property without permission from a state historical commission.

In her letter, Folt did not draw an explicit connection between her decision to remove the monument base and plaques and her decision to step down from the chancellorship. But the system Board of Governors went into emergency closed session shortly before her announcement.

Folt wrote that she has always been driven by the “new and the next.” As she reflected on accomplishments at Chapel Hill, she decided it was time to transfer leadership to a new chancellor and look toward her own future, she wrote.

“Most importantly, we must always do what we can to make sure our faculty, students and staff have a creative, innovative work and living environment, one that is inclusive, forward-looking and safe,” Folt wrote. “This year for example, we reached our highest level of research funding ever (5th in the nation in federal funds), continued to see historic increases in first-year applications and levels of philanthropy, and pushed ahead as a national leader in affordability, access and student graduation rates. These accomplishments show how talented and dedicated our community is and what can be achieved even in the face of disruption. Just imagine what is possible if we can put our full attention to the potentials and needs of the future.”

A full article on this news will be published tomorrow.

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UNC Board Rejects Plan for Confederate Monument

The University of North Carolina Board of Governors on Friday rejected a plan to build a new history center on campus to house Silent Sam, a Confederate monument widely seen on the campus as a symbol of white supremacy.

Chapel Hill's campus board and its chancellor, Carol Folt, proposed spending $5 million on a history center that would house the monument and also tell the story of race at the university. Folt has said she would prefer for the statue to be moved off campus but that North Carolina law generally bars moving such monuments off campus. Protesters toppled the statue in August, and many fear that restoring it to its old location would simply lead to more attempts to bring it down. Student and faculty groups have demanded that the statue be kept off campus, and some teaching assistants have held a grading strike to protest the plan to bring the statue back, even in a history center. There were also protests outside Friday's meeting. Many have also questioned spending money to house and protect the statue.

But some politicians and at least one Board of Governors member have called for the statue to go back to its place on campus, outside.

The UNC system board, which acted Friday, appointed a committee to come up with a new plan for Silent Sam, to be considered by March 15. Here is a tweet from Chapel Hill:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Newbury College Will Close

Newbury College, in Massachusetts, announced today that it will shut down at the end of the spring 2019 semester.

A statement from Joseph L. Chillo, the president, said in part: "It is no secret that weighty financial challenges are pressing on liberal arts colleges throughout the country. Newbury College is no exception. These financial challenges, the product of major changes in demographics and costs, are the driving factors behind our decision to close at the end of this academic year. The decision was not arrived at lightly because we know how much Newbury College means to so many. Our decision to close comes only after a tireless pursuit of multiple options to remain open and continue serving our students as a beacon of opportunity and hope to achieve the dreams of a college education."

Newbury is located outside of Boston. Its fall 2018 enrollment was 627.

A full article on the closure will appear on Monday.

 

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