Curriculum

Curriculum

University of Southern Maine student Nathan Henry, a young white man wearing a hooded sweatshirt and backward baseball cap, receives a nasal swab from a health-care worker wearing blue protective gear during COVID-19 testing.
Jan 06, 2023
Bachelor’s programs in public health have surpassed master’s degrees in popularity. What does that mean for a field that desperately needs more workers?

Archive

March 3, 2005
Lots of colleges brag about undergraduate research, but particularly in the sciences, separating the substance from the fluff is a challenge. Outside validation helps, and Cody Locke's work on epilepsy research at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa has it.
February 25, 2005
Today's students have different expectations and skills with regard to technology, and colleges sometimes fail to meet those expectations or understand what those skills mean, according to a new e-book.The e-book, the first published by Educause, is Educating the Net Generation. It is available free on the organization's Web site. Diana G. Oblinger, a vice president of Educause and co-editor of the book, answered some questions about its themes in an e-mail interview:
February 22, 2005
A state university system's bid to help undergraduates finish in four years is expected to lead to a boom in "hybrid" distance education.
February 21, 2005
Faculty panel rejects phasing out the teaching of ancient Greek -- and sees "incalculable" damage from the way cuts were proposed.
February 10, 2005
Should a liberal arts university even think about phasing out instruction in ancient Greek?
February 8, 2005
Stanford elevates "ethical reasoning" in general education program; some fear diversity issues are getting downgraded.
January 28, 2005
A group of colleges started an effort Thursday to redefine liberal education -- and to ensure that all colleges that profess to provide one actually do.
January 21, 2005
The University of Dayton's law school has become the first in the nation to offer a five-semester program, instead of the traditional six. Until last year, the American Bar Association required six semesters, so the option Dayton is offering was impossible. Dayton's program, under which students can take their first semester in the summer, will make it possible for student to obtain a law degree in just two years. Students still have the option of a six-semester program.
January 20, 2005
The University of Pennsylvania has wrapped up its grand experiment in curricular reform.

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