Discrimination

Discrimination

Jewish students, some wearing yarmulkes, sit in rows in a room with stained-glass windows at an event at Stanford Hillel.
Oct 27, 2022
Stanford University uncovered a history of the institution limiting Jewish student enrollments, and now the university is looking for ways to redress its past.

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November 2, 2022
A wave of anti-Israel and often antisemitic activity has made American campuses an increasingly unsafe place for Jewish students, Jonathan Greenblatt writes.
October 27, 2022
Stanford University uncovered a history of the institution limiting Jewish student enrollments, and now the university is looking for ways to redress its past.
October 26, 2022
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, are on a multidisciplinary mission to determine why people feel hatred.
September 22, 2022
As discriminatory state laws proliferate, higher ed associations need policies to guide decisions on whether to relocate the annual meeting, Erin Hennessy writes.
July 27, 2022
The Office for Civil Rights will investigate whether USC failed to protect a Jewish student from discrimination and harassment because of her support for Israel. 
June 8, 2022
Seattle Pacific University’s board voted to maintain a policy that bars hiring LGBTQ+ individuals. The decision has sparked protests from students and faculty who are pushing to change the policy.
May 25, 2022
Editors and event organizers should not accept proposals from researchers representing institutions with policies that discriminate against LGBTQ students and staff, Kim Manturuk writes.
May 3, 2022
Journalists and scholars regularly mischaracterize legislation against critical race theory, wrongly implying that discomfort-creating lessons are illegal, Peter Minowitz writes.
March 16, 2022
UT Austin lost a pregnancy- and sex-bias case against a professor who said the university held her motherhood against her in her tenure bid. Now the university owes her $3 million.
March 15, 2022
Georgetown Law’s response to multiple racially charged incidents has been alarming, Andrew Koppelman argues.

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