Technology transfer

Cornell Tech officially opens campus on New York City's Roosevelt Island

Almost seven years after winning high-profile competition, Cornell Tech opens on Roosevelt Island, with 30 faculty members and almost 300 graduate students.

Carnegie Mellon wins more than $1 billion in patent case

Jury awards record-setting payment after finding that Marvell infringed on the university's patents. Judge could triple the sum.

Higher ed split on merits of patent company Intellectual Ventures

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Some colleges say Intellectual Ventures, a company that acquires patents, is a worthy partner and smart investment. Others fear the company's lawsuits squelch innovation.

Senate bill hopes to speed up technology licensing process

Commercialization offices are fighting a Kauffman proposal that would let researchers take potential commercial ideas to any technology transfer partner, not just their home institution.

Research universities quietly collaborate with Facebook. What are they working on?

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A growing number of academics are working with the social media platform to build new products, but few want to talk about it.

UC Regents Win Prostate Cancer Drug Rulings

A long-running dispute over licensing of prostate cancer drugs has ended in the University of California’s favor.

California’s Supreme Court last week upheld lower court rulings in favor of the University of California Board of Regents. The decision effectively awards the university $32 million in additional licensing income while also resolving contract claims against the regents and confirming a jury verdict clearing a drug inventor of fraud.

Litigation was first filed in the dispute more than five years ago, in May 2011. At issue was the licensing of two prostate cancer drugs -- one called Xtandi and another referred to as A52. The regents licensed Xtandi to biopharmaceutical company Medivation Inc. But Medivation claimed breach of contract against the regents after they licensed the other drug, A52, to a different company, Aragon Pharmaceuticals. Medivation claimed it should have received the A52 license.

Information came to light during the litigation process that led the regents to file a cross complaint claiming they were underpaid on drugs licensed to Medivation. The regents won a bench trial in that matter, and lawyers won a jury trial on whether University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Michael Jung -- a drug inventor -- defrauded Medivation out of rights to A52. The regents also won a summary adjudication that eliminated the company’s contract claims against them and established that it had no rights to A52, according to a press release from the law firm representing the regents, Crowell and Moring.

Medivation appealed the decision, but the First Appellate District for the California Court of Appeal affirmed the rulings in September. The state’s Supreme Court upheld that Court of Appeal’s findings Dec. 14.

Inside Higher Ed is also one of Crowell and Moring’s clients.

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U.S. universities dominate in international patents

American universities continue to dominate in numbers of applications, but submissions from other countries are going up.

New York's tax-free plan puts SUNY at the center of economic development

The state has created tax-free zones around its universities as part of an effort to stimulate economic development. Officials hope to take academic-corporate partnerships beyond the typical ties.

UCLA tells professors not to apply for major new pharmaceutical grant

UCLA tells professors not to apply for new grants from pharmaceutical company, saying that the requirements violate university rules.

University licensing income rose slightly in 2011

Colleges and universities derived $1.81 billion in revenue from their research-based inventions and created more startup companies in 2011, an annual survey shows.

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