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Maintaining online courses into maturity requires substantial investment

The cost of maintaining an online course for several years can eventually outstrip the launch cost -- but the investment might just pay off.

Massachusetts debates new regulatory requirements on private colleges in the wake of Mount Ida's closure

After Mount Ida College closure, Massachusetts proposals grapple with whether colleges should disclose shutdown possibilities and when regulators should step in.

Cal State allows students to take online courses from other system institutions

University system's program will let residential students enroll at no charge in online courses from any of the system's 23 campuses -- not just the one where they're enrolled.

Berklee College of Music defies conventional wisdom with low-price online program

Most institutions charge students the same or more for online programs than for face-to-face. Berklee has found success with a pricing model that favors online students.

Canvas catches, and maybe passes, Blackboard as top learning management system for U.S. colleges

Blackboard dominated the U.S. learning management system market for 20 years, but new data show its cloud-based competitor edging past it.

Stephen F. Austin optimizes course schedule to add faculty lines that paid for themselves

Facing a budget cut and clogged general education courses, Stephen F. Austin optimized its course schedule to add faculty lines that paid for themselves, and then some.

Antioch College survived furloughs and salary cuts, but worries remain

Concerns rise over enrollment and finances at the storied small liberal arts college in Ohio.

Cost concerns keep cloud services out of reach of many small colleges

Section: 

Many colleges are embracing IT cloud services, but significant cost barriers remain for smaller institutions.

Grand Canyon U succeeds in second bid to go nonprofit

Grand Canyon, a large, thriving Christian for-profit, will divide in two, with new nonprofit university giving for-profit company 60 percent of tuition in exchange for a broad range of support services.

New University of Oklahoma president wastes no time with administrative overhaul

New president's deep cuts and broad reorganization are unusual for higher ed, even for a university saddled with debt and a cabinet some saw as unwieldy.

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