Political science

Political science meeting interrupted by hotel fire

Smart Title: 

Scholars at annual meeting were forced to evacuate their rooms Friday night -- but meeting one another in pajamas didn't stop them from tweeting.

Why does academic plagiarism not offend much of the public?

Smart Title: 

Senator John Walsh appears to have plagiarized final paper for master's degree. It would have been the nail in an academic's coffin, but he remains in Congress and in race for election this fall. Why?

Essay on difficulty of finding a job for an expert on Russia

The United States needs experts on Russia. But Mark Lawrence Schrad, one such expert, describes how difficult it is to find a job in academe with this specialty.

Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Image Source: 
Wikipedia

In wake of Coburn amendment repeal, social science groups plot path forward

Smart Title: 

The budget passed by Congress last week removes controversial restrictions of NSF funding for the discipline -- but advocates for social science researchers say the battle isn't over.

Conference Connoisseurs visit the City of Brotherly Love (and cheesesteaks)

Our conference-going gourmands check out the culinary treats of the City of Brotherly Love.

Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Dog's degree disappoints a cat family (essay)

The news that the BBC-sponsored dog named Pete, using the alias Peter Smith, has procured an online M.B.A. from the American University of London has sent our household into a literal tailspin.

It is not the first time that our cat, Finn Segal, has disappointed us by failing to live up to our expectations, but this may be the last straw. Perhaps most disconcerting is that even now he shows no concern and has stubbornly assumed his usual meatloaf position in a sunny spot.

It’s not that Finn, with a little training, could not master the computer keys. He is already adept at stepping on the capslock and delete buttons. And he darn well has a working knowledge of the internet; it’s just that this slacker would rather spend 8 hours a day watching cat and chipmunk videos on YouTube than applying himself to “International Finance.” 

Especially galling is the fact that not only could our cat have been a contender, but he also let slip through his paws the definitive answer to the time-honored question of “Just who’s smarter: dogs or cats?”

In fact, I will wager a six-month supply of Revolution Parasiticide (for fleas, ear mites, and heartworm) that Finn was the first to complete an online class. Just last winter, we enrolled in an online course in "Introduction to Poetry." While it is true that we registered under my name alone, Finn was with me every step of the way.

Moreover, I am now willing, given the present circumstance and dismaying news about Pete, to come forward with an admission: Finn logged more hours than I did. By the fourth lesson, he had moved into the alpha chair in the study, freeing me up to take care of other tasks around the house and the town. I have many warm memories from that time, when I would peek into the study and see Finn curled up on my desk chair, quietly napping as a soothing voice read from the works of John Keats, Sylvia Plath and Wallace Stevens.

As of today we are instituting a new instructional regime for Finn. He will still be allowed to go outside and he will still be permitted to watch YouTube -- but only after he has completed his M.B.A.-related coursework for the day.

After all, if he could complete a session devoted to the poems of John Ashbery, Finn should have no trouble at all with “Taxation and Accounting.”

Carolyn Foster Segal is professor emerita of English at Cedar Crest College. She currently teaches at Muhlenberg College.

Editorial Tags: 
Image Source: 
istockphoto.com/vitalytitov

Study examines trends in the Ph.D. programs that produce political science professors

Smart Title: 

New analysis draws attention to the influence of a relatively small number of programs -- and also points to doctoral programs that punch above their weight.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Political science
Back to Top