Quick Takes: U.S. Panel to Study Textbook Prices, Review of Va.'s New Higher Ed System, NCAA Transfer Rule Raises Concern, Charges Against a Dean

  • Members of the House of Representatives Committee on Education and the Workforce have asked the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance to conduct a study the rising cost of textbooks and recommend ways to bring those costs under control, the advisory committee said in a news release Monday. The advisory panel said the House committee's chairman, Rep. Howard P. (Buck) McKeon (R-Calif.) and Rep.
  • June 6, 2006
     
  • Members of the House of Representatives Committee on Education and the Workforce have asked the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance to conduct a study the rising cost of textbooks and recommend ways to bring those costs under control, the advisory committee said in a news release Monday. The advisory panel said the House committee's chairman, Rep. Howard P. (Buck) McKeon (R-Calif.) and Rep. David Wu (D-Ore.) had requested the yearlong study.
  • The State of Virginia's newly restructed higher education system gets largely positive reviews in an assessment to be released today by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.  The report describes the new system, in which colleges gained more freedom to operate and set tuition but state legislators imposed some new accountability measures, as an example of "checks and balances at work."
  • A little-noticed new National Collegiate Athletic Association rule will allow graduate students in football, basketball and baseball to transfer from one Division I college to another without having to sit out of competition from a year, and many coaches are upset, according to USA Today.
  • Federal officials released a report Monday detailing allegations against a dean recently dismissed at scandal-plagued University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, The New York Times reported. According to the report, Warren S. Wallace, who oversaw admissions, tried to have his daughter admitted to medical school at the university, sent catering business to a friend, and hid the extent of his expenses. Wallace and his lawyer did not comment.
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