Quick Takes: Slippery Rock Ordered to Restore Women's Teams, Conflicts of Interest Alleged, New Push for Physics, Universities Open in Haifa but Not Beirut, Fine for Illegal Political Spending, Canadian Student Aid Faulted

  • A federal judge ruled Friday that Slippery Rock University must restore its women's swimming and water polo teams. The ruling found that because Slippery Rock was not in compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prior to the cuts, it was illegal for the university to eliminate viable women's teams. An injunction will now bar the teams' elimination pending further review.
  • July 25, 2006
     
  • A federal judge ruled Friday that Slippery Rock University must restore its women's swimming and water polo teams. The ruling found that because Slippery Rock was not in compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prior to the cuts, it was illegal for the university to eliminate viable women's teams. An injunction will now bar the teams' elimination pending further review. University officials have not responded to the ruling, but argued in court that they were trying to be fair when they eliminated the women's teams and also five men's teams. The university initially also wanted to eliminate field hockey, but reversed itself after students threatened to file a Title IX suit.
  • Nearly one in five scientists on panels of the National Academy of Sciences has direct financial ties to companies with a stake in the outome of those panels' work, according to an analysis released Monday by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
  • The United States needs to reinforce its commitment and financial support for atomic, molecular and optical sciences, according to a report released Monday by the National Research Council. The report warns that the dominance of the United States in these fields is threatened at a time that the research could lead to important advances in energy, health, security and understanding the laws of physics.
  • The University of Haifa and the Technion, both of which suspended programs because of missiles fired on northern Israel by Hezbollah, have both started to resume normal summer operations. American University of Beirut continues to face extremely difficult conditions because of Israeli missiles in the area and increasing shortages of fuel and other necessary supplies. The university posted an emergency appeal to alumni and friends on its Web site. And in a small sign of the realities of operating a campus people can't get to, the university announced that it would not impose fines on those unable to get to the library to return books.
  • Serafin Zasueta, the former president of Southwestern College, a community college in California, was fined and sentenced to probation for three years by a federal judge last week for using college funds in a political campaign, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. A consultant was also sentenced in the case, in which both men deny wrongdoing.
  • Canada's student aid system faces a "looming crisis" because of its lack of emphasis on helping the neediest students, the rising costs of student loans, and interest in Ottawa in shifting responsibility for student aid to the provinces, warns a new report, "Student Aid Time Bomb," released by the Educational Policy Institute.
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