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November 20, 2006

Mary Burgan, former general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, is not happy about the trends she sees with regard to faculty rights. Traditional governance models are being replaced with strict hierarchies, and too many faculty members have too little influence in crucial decisions, she writes, in What Ever Happened to the Faculty? Drift and Decision in Higher Education, just published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

November 20, 2006

When it comes to introductory courses in religion and theology, the big division isn't a question of faith, but of priorities.  Students want lots of discussion in class sessions and they want to learn facts about religious groups. They also want to become better people. Professors aren't opposed to any of those things, but they are much more interested in teaching critical thinking. While the numbers vary, the gap between students' and professors' goals for these courses is evident at both religious and non-religious institutions.

November 20, 2006

Carl Wieman, Nobel laureate, sees the scientific method as key to improving science education.

November 20, 2006

It is unlikely to quiet the burgeoning cries of alarm about a perceived crisis in American scientific competitiveness. But a new report from the National Science Foundation offers some evidence both of progress and of continued problems.

November 17, 2006

Finance Committee plans hearing -- but on link between tax breaks and rising tuition, not college  governance or pay.

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