Quick Takes: Boston Wants More Money, The Trustee Who Billed and Billed, New Call to Lift Cuba Exchange Limits, Sharing the Results of Clinical Trials, Retirement Incentives in Rhode Island

  • Boston's mayor is today creating a special panel to try to get more money from colleges and universities, which as nonprofit institutions do not pay most taxes, The Boston Globe reported.
  • December 9, 2008
     
  • Boston's mayor is today creating a special panel to try to get more money from colleges and universities, which as nonprofit institutions do not pay most taxes, The Boston Globe reported. Many colleges make special payments in lieu of taxes, but city officials say those sums are a small fraction of what colleges should be paying.
  • Maria Elena Serna resigned Monday from the board of San Joaquin Delta College Monday just before pleading no contest to a charge that she claimed reimbursement twice for several business trips for the college dating back to 2005, The Record reported. In some cases, she insisted on being reimbursed for meals at events that provided meals for all attendees. Her resignation letter cited her health.
  • A coalition of academic, business and other organizations is calling on the yet-to-take-office Obama administration to ease restrictions on academic and other exchanges with Cuba. Limits on exchanges have been "counterproductive," the groups argue in a statement. The academic organizations that signed include NAFSA: Association of International Educators, the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, the Latin American Studies Association and the Social Science Research Council.
  • Researchers generally don't tell the 2.3 million people in the United States who participate in clinical trials what the results of those studies are, and that should change, according to an article published in the Archives of Neurology by a team of researchers at the University of Rochester. The article describes efforts to provide more information to trial participants, and argues that failure to do so can leave many participants in clinical trials confused and frustrated.
  • Rhode Island's public colleges and universities have been offering increased incentives to administrators and others to retire, The Providence Journal reported. The paper noted that when John Nazarian, the former president of Rhode Island College, retired in June, at age 75, he received a severance check of more than $200,000.
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