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February 15, 2005
For five years, graduate students facing stress or feeling suicidal have had a hotline that they could call 24/7.On Monday, the founders of the hotline announced that they had turned it over to another group. While about 50 universities have publicized the service, many others have declined to do so because it was created by a religious organization, the Campus Crusade for Christ. The hotline organizers decided it would be best to find a secular home for the hotline, so it could reach more people.

February 15, 2005
Put a bunch of college officials in a room the week after the release of the federal budget proposal, and it's not hard to tell what it contained. Lots of money, lots of smiles (O.K., that doesn't happen a lot).With a budget like last week's -- full of hundreds of millions of dollars in proposed cuts to programs that colleges hold dear -- the mood is one of uncertainty and frustration. And that was evident Monday at the National Legislative Summit put on annually by the Association of Community College Trustees and American Association of Community Colleges.

February 14, 2005
The professor who leads the center that invited Ward Churchill quits her administrative post.

February 14, 2005
A pair of sexual harassment claims against professors at Western Oregon University has drawn the attention of the state's top official.

February 14, 2005
A federal panel recommends meningitis vaccination for all college freshmen who live in dorms.

February 14, 2005
We asked some of our favorite poetry professors -- many of them poets themselves -- for verses of love academics might want to recite for their Valentines. We hope some of their ideas may inspire.

February 14, 2005
Colleges need to accept that the "social compact" between higher education and government that led to a century of growth for American higher education is dead and will not return, Larry R. Faulkner said Sunday.Faulkner, president of the University of Texas at Austin, delivered that message to hundreds of college presidents gathered in Washington for the annual meeting of the American Council on Education. Bemoaning the death of the compact is not of itself earth-shattering -- academics have been complaining along those lines for some time.

February 11, 2005
If a report issued Thursday gains momentum, the tenure clock -- and many other things about faculty career paths -- could see significant changes.The American Council on Education released the report, which attacks what David Ward, president of the council, called the "rigidity" of the tenure system. The report warns that unless colleges become more flexible about how professors are recruited and what is expected of them, they will lose much of the best talent -- especially women.

February 11, 2005
In a highly unusual move, the presidents of three leading universities issued a statement Thursday to challenge the views of Lawrence H. Summers, the president of Harvard University, on women and science.Summers has apologized for his statements, in which he suggested that "innate differences" between men and women may be a reason why there are so few women in science.

February 11, 2005
When Ward Churchill's scheduled appearance at Hamilton College this month was called off because of threats of violence, the debate about his appearance didn't go away. In formal forums and informal discussions, online and in person, students and faculty members have continued to talk.

February 10, 2005
The Marines are back at Middlebury College -- recruiting this week for the first time in at least a decade. But before they could recruit, they had to agree to explain the military's policies that discriminate against gay people, and to answer questions about those policies at an open campus forum.

February 10, 2005
Should a liberal arts university even think about phasing out instruction in ancient Greek?

February 10, 2005
The university agrees to pay $500,000 and 3 scientists accept severe restrictions on their work.

February 10, 2005
Congress offered a first glimpse Wednesday at the new federal job training program for community colleges that President Bush unveiled more than a year ago. It came as members of a House of Representatives subcommittee approved a bill to renew the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.Officials of two-year colleges generally liked what they saw.

February 9, 2005
A scholar's Web essay accuses the embattled Colorado professor of "research fraud."

February 9, 2005
During the tech boom of the '90s, New York University and Western Governors University were among the ambitious innovators in distance education. NYU created a for-profit, online spinoff. After a few years, it tanked. Western Governors, with its emphasis on "competency based" education, predicted it would quickly enroll thousands of students -- and ended up with dozens.This week, both institutions are turning corners in their distance programs.

February 9, 2005
For much of the last year, community colleges and the Bush administration have, symbolically, been dancing cheek to cheek. Given what's in the Bush administration's 2006 budget proposal, they may spend the next few months fighting toe to toe.

February 8, 2005
Nebraska shrinks its staff and its office to avoid cutting the number of books that it publishes.

February 8, 2005
Ward Churchill never got to talk at Hamilton College. But the controversial ethnic studies professor was supposed to have a platform tonight at his home campus, the University of Colorado at Boulder.

February 8, 2005
Stanford elevates "ethical reasoning" in general education program; some fear diversity issues are getting downgraded.

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