Inside Higher Ed's News

Earlier News

January 17, 2006
"Vagina Monologues," a campus event nationwide, prompts debate on inclusion when Michigan organizers try to cast only minority women.

January 17, 2006
A professor at Texas A&M University is being sued by a biotechnology company that claims he gave away trade secrets in a footnote of a paper he gave at a conference, violating the terms of an agreement the company had with the University of Connecticut, where the professor formerly worked, the Associated Press reported. Lawyers for Thomas K.

January 16, 2006
Fed up with RateMyProfessors.com? A new Web site offers you equal time.

January 16, 2006
New study shows just how far away state and local governments have moved from supporting 2-year institutions.

January 16, 2006
Congress slashes funds for programs aimed at training doctors in geriatrics and other fields and diversifying work force.

January 16, 2006
The Federal Bureau of Investigation's file on Edward Said, the late literary figure and Palestinian activist, is explored -- via a Freedom of Information Act request -- in an article published Friday in Counterpunch.  An investigative article in The Philadelphia Inquirer found that many colleges are incomplete or inaccurate in the crime reports that federal law requires them to maintain.The Supreme Judi

January 16, 2006
The strange story of Jacques Pluss just got stranger.

January 16, 2006
Indiana U. president, under fire from faculty, will leave in 2 years -- and issues restructuring plan that wins praise from his Bloomington critics.

January 13, 2006
A government sponsored committee discusses biological studies after  9/11.

January 13, 2006
Dispute over collective bargaining for part-time faculty members appears likely to head to court.

January 13, 2006
University says rules were misunderstood, but that underlying philosophy will remain in place.

January 13, 2006
Senate scrutiny of Alito's ties to reactionary alumni group provokes reflection on Princeton's past and present.

January 13, 2006
Anton Armstrong, director of the St. Olaf College Choir, has been named the 2006 recipient of the Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching -- considered the most lucrative prize for college teaching. Armstrong will receive $200,000 and St. Olaf's music department will receive $25,000. The award is sponsored by Baylor University.The U.S.

January 13, 2006
U. of Richmond leader announces plans to resign amid continued criticism of his comments and agenda.

January 12, 2006
DNA patents encourage academic research, and often do not restrict information, study finds.

January 12, 2006
A new mystery, "The Missing Professor," aims to promote faculty development.

January 12, 2006
Wheaton of Illinois faces scrutiny for firing professor who became Catholic; Oklahoma Christian U. may fire those who divorce.

January 12, 2006
Momentum to enact key legislation may be undercut by budget measure and political climate on Capitol Hill.

January 12, 2006
A study being released today by Commonfund finds that college endowments experienced endowment returns of 9.7 percent last year, USA Today  reported. As is typically the case, colleges with larger endowments saw better returns. The Commonfund survey does not release information on the endowments size of of institutions, by name.

January 11, 2006
Texas oilman donates $165 million for athletics facilities -- the biggest gift in college sports history.

Pages

Featured Colleges

Back to Top