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Earlier News

January 10, 2006
The latest hearing by a Pennsylvania legislative committee investigating allegations of political bias at universities featured one complaining student, who admitted to never having filed a grievance with his university, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

January 10, 2006
Scholars of war and the military consider how the Iraq conflict changes their responsibilities and careers.

January 10, 2006
Division III keeps out the redshirt; academic progress rates coming soon; presidential involvement in Division I; and more.

January 10, 2006
Supreme Court lets stand ruling favoring public university's policy on blocking unsolicited e-mail messages.

January 9, 2006
When most scholars have their grant applications rejected by the National Endowment for the Humanities, they shrug. Only a small minority of grants are approved, so there's no way any application can be a sure thing.

January 9, 2006
Rep. John Boehner, an Ohio Republican, on Sunday announced that he is running for House Majority Leader. Boehner, chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee, plays a key role in legislation affecting colleges. He has criticized colleges for not being accountable enough for their costs or for difficulty that students from nationally accredited institutions have in transferring their credits to regionally accredited ones.

January 9, 2006
Members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s Division I voted at the group’s annual convention in Indianapolis Saturday to overturn increases in the maximum number of scholarships available for female athletes. Critics characterized the move as a setback for women's sports, but supporters of the reversal said the proposed increases were not the best way to help female athletes and would favor the division's wealthier programs.

January 9, 2006
Appropriations are up 5.3%, allowing for increases many public colleges haven't experienced in years.

January 9, 2006
At presidents' summit, Bush administration officials propose Fulbright expansion and ask colleges for help.

January 9, 2006
Members of the American Historical Association voted Saturday to condemn the Academic Bill of Rights as an attack on academic freedom. The unanimous vote reflected widespread anger in the association, and among academics generally, about the Academic Bill of Rights, which has become a conservative cause in many state legislatures and on many campuses.But the vote followed another one in which the association rejected a proposal to replace the resolution condemning the Academic Bill of Rights with one that also criticized campus speech codes.

January 6, 2006
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has issued rules to close a loophole under which some college athletes were qualifying to live in federally subsidized housing. Congress ordered the rule change after Sen.

January 6, 2006
Robert Berdahl -- who led UC-Berkeley and UT-Austin -- will move into Washington role at Association of American Universities.

January 6, 2006
On Thursday, President Bush and a bevy of government officials -- including the secretaries of state, education and defense -- announced a wide ranging plan to enhance the foreign language skills of American students.

January 6, 2006
U.S. study finds expansion is greater among instructors than administrators.

January 6, 2006
At meetings of economists and of historians, scholars trade ideas on syllabuses, lecture classes, homework, silent students and more.

January 5, 2006
The Graduate Management Admission Test, used by business schools for admission to MBA programs, will now use fingerprinting to assure test security. People taking a test will have to provide a fingerprint when they check in and every time they enter a testing room. Digital photographs will also be required.

January 5, 2006
Public institutions in New Jersey face intense scrutiny from both state and federal governmental officials.

January 5, 2006
Clinical law professors, who often stick their necks out when picking cases, consider how to protect themselves.

January 5, 2006
Experts say timing may be just right for changes MLA panel is putting forth -- particularly the move beyond the monograph.

January 5, 2006
Over the past decade and a half, the number and proportion of college students opting not to reveal their race when asked have shot up, to 5.9 percent of all students in 2001 from 3.2 percent a decade earlier. The increases have raised two major questions: Who are these students, and why are they declining to identify themselves? The answers have implications for college officials and policy makers on a wide range of issues, including affirmative action and student life.

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