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January 31, 2006
“What you gon’ do with all that junk? All that junk inside that trunk?”While the Black Eyed Peas’ answer to those questions involves getting “love drunk off my hump,” some professors at the Berklee College of Music, in Boston, offer up an entirely different response to the lyrics -- one aimed at helping their students understand the “commercialization of hip-hop” and the role students have in evolving the genre.

January 31, 2006
Some colleges that took in Katrina-displaced students forgo federal funds so others can get more. Other colleges seek every penny.

January 31, 2006
As federal budget process gears up, Congressional aides anticipate more cuts to college-related programs.

January 31, 2006
From recruiting newsletters to shoe companies, big time college sports prospects sift through a maze of potential influences.

January 31, 2006
A local library director insisted on a warrant when Federal Bureau of Investigation officials showed up this month seeking access to computers to check out an alleged threat against Brandeis University, American Libraries reported.

January 30, 2006
Belmont Abbey College, in North Carolina, has started a concentration in motor sports management as part of its undergraduate degree in business.Johns Hopkins University has started a master's degree in bioinformatics, which combines computer science and molecular biology.

January 30, 2006
William Kirby will return to teaching amid grumbling over curricular review and reported split with Summers.

January 30, 2006
Presidents, provosts, deans and professors consider principles and data they need to promote their curricular ideals.

January 30, 2006
Stanford offers new policy to help pregnant grad students.

January 30, 2006
The Massachusetts Board of Higher Education has created a new panel to study the low graduation rates at community colleges in the state, The Boston Globe reported. Just over 16 percent of students at the colleges earn degrees or certificates within three years.

January 30, 2006
Public universities in the United States may be at a turning point, write Katharine C. Lyall and Kathleen R. Sell in The True Genius of America at Risk: Are We Losing Our Public Universities to De Facto Privatization? (Praeger). The new book comes at a time that many leading public universities are conducting billion-dollar fund raising campaigns while finding it difficult to match their states' ambitions with legislative appropriations.

January 27, 2006
Ohio State and UT-Austin -- 2 of the largest universities in U.S. -- may revamp requirements with theme-based sequences.

January 27, 2006
When David Horowitz talks about fair treatment of students in the classroom, perceived political bias is front and center. But put a bunch of professors together to discuss that subject, and grading tops the list.At a session entitled “Perceptions of Fairness in the College Classroom,” at the annual meeting of the Association of American Colleges and Universities in Washington Thursday, faculty members pondered the student who works his or her tail off, but never quite edges out some talented peers who rarely study but ace the test nonetheless.

January 27, 2006
Bolstering U.S. competitiveness is not just the government's job, research university group says in new report.

January 27, 2006
Gov. Matt Blunt of Missouri has proposed converting the state's student-loan agency into a public-private partnership. Blunt, a Republican, says that by selling the agency, with certain restrictions, the impact on student borrowers could be minimal and the state could gain hundreds of millions of dollars, which would then be spent on college facilities and scholarships.

January 27, 2006
AAUP’s “Boston experiment” garners another success, say organizers.

January 27, 2006
Scholars issue draft "declaration" calling for expanded role of religion in curriculum and student life -- at religious and secular colleges.

January 26, 2006
State civil rights commission detects bias in denial of tenure to engineering professor whom a colleague called "too old."

January 26, 2006
Senators introduce plan to spend $9 billion to improve competitiveness.

January 26, 2006
Like many industries, Richard Lapchick argues, college sports subscribes to the "old boys' network" approach to employment -- the idea that the people doing the hiring are typically drawn to those with whom they are comfortable, which often means people who look like them.

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