Inside Higher Ed's News

Earlier News

November 2, 2005
San Francisco State investigates charges of racial profiling after a scholar is arrested trying to go to his own office.

November 2, 2005
Dillard University on Tuesday announced the layoffs of 202 people -- more than half of faculty and staff jobs, The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported. No tenured faculty members lost their jobs.

November 2, 2005
Do professors at state colleges have different speech protections from other public employees? A court says No.

November 2, 2005
Scholars' association charges groups that review colleges of education and social work with using ideological tests on students.

November 2, 2005
Northeastern forum tried to exclude those who are not minority women and after administrators intervened, charges started flying.

November 1, 2005
Civil liberties group charges that university's policies are so broad that common jokes could get someone expelled.

November 1, 2005
New contract at New School could provide a national model for giving adjuncts job security.

November 1, 2005
One former grad student's charges have prompted some changes -- insufficient, he says -- at an engineering college.

November 1, 2005
Judge Samuel Alito, President Bush's new nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, has not written many decisions that relate directly to higher education. But he has taken strong First Amendment stands in defending the rights of a student newspaper and in questioning anti-harassment rules at a public school.

November 1, 2005
When colleges first started developing systems for allocating financial aid dollars, an unchallenged assumption was that Mom and Dad were a single economic unit. That assumption can no longer be made, and colleges have struggled to find a way to deal with many scenarios of family life today -- the parents who aren't just divorced but aren't speaking, the prenup that covered college expenses, the millionaire step-parent.

November 1, 2005
New York University's union of graduate students has announced plans to strike next week. The university, which previously recognized the union, announced that it would no longer do so and union officials have said that they need a strike to get the university to return to collective bargaining. University officials have said that unionization was not good for the university, while union officials say that only collective bargaining can adequately protect the interests of teaching assistants.The U.S.

October 31, 2005
At College Board annual meeting, educators seek ways to reach new groups of potential students -- and realize it's not easy.

October 31, 2005
Readers offer expert advice on the perfect costume to inspire fear at an academic Halloween party.

October 31, 2005
Xavier University of Louisiana announced on its Web site Friday that it would lay off employees, cancel numerous programs, limit graduate study to online offerings, and suspend conference play for its sports teams until fall 2006.

October 31, 2005
A new report warns that declining funds for physics and engineering puts more than the U.S.'s economic status at risk.

October 31, 2005
Total enrollment is up, as is minority enrollment, but difficulties persist with international recruitment.

October 31, 2005
To mark Campus Equity Week, part-timers in Vermont are using an unusual ad campaign.

October 28, 2005
Study of the country and its language is booming at U.S. colleges -- and changes in high schools may swell enrollments further.

October 28, 2005
Does a monument to the civil rights struggle at Ole Miss need to be "positive"?

October 28, 2005
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced Thursday that it has fired Luk Van Parijs as associate professor of biology after he admitted to fabricating and falsifying research data. The MIT statement said that no other members of Van Parijs's team were involved in the misconduct, and that MIT was forwarding its findings to federal officials.

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