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February 28, 2005
University of Colorado officials find themselves boxed in a corner as they try to figure out what to do about Ward Churchill.

February 25, 2005
With a $20 million gift, the University of Michigan creates a research center that may shift the field.

February 25, 2005
Today's students have different expectations and skills with regard to technology, and colleges sometimes fail to meet those expectations or understand what those skills mean, according to a new e-book.The e-book, the first published by Educause, is Educating the Net Generation. It is available free on the organization's Web site. Diana G. Oblinger, a vice president of Educause and co-editor of the book, answered some questions about its themes in an e-mail interview:

February 25, 2005
The report's language is unambiguous: "At every step -- eligibility, admission, enrollment, and graduation -- Hispanic and black students fare worse than white and Asian students in the University of California System."For the California State University system, Hispanic students are underrepresented. And while the state's community colleges do reflect the ethnic and racial mix of the state's high school graduates, Hispanic and black students are less likely to transfer to four-year institutions than are white students.

February 24, 2005
NYU, the first private institution to reach a contract with a T.A. union, may try to make that pact its last.

February 24, 2005
A graduate student discovers that a 19th-century novelist who has been hailed as an early black female writer was actually white.

February 24, 2005
City officials sue the university over its expansion plans.

February 24, 2005
Having abandoned one general education exam in December, ETS announces a replacement.

February 23, 2005
Support fell by more than 10 percent in 2003, to $14.3 billion, but education remained the top category for grants.

February 23, 2005
A report about physics suggests that women are leaving the field early, between high school and college.

February 23, 2005
Lawrence H. Summers, Harvard's embattled president, apologized to faculty members Tuesday not only for his comments about women and science, but for a management style that many have said is too domineering.

February 23, 2005
Carnegie Mellon said the university never provided funds for a hateful speaker. But one of its research centers had pledged support. 

February 22, 2005
A student at Ohio State University decided to protest policies there by putting the institution's president, Karen Holbrook, up for auction on eBay, the Associated Press reports. The posting was removed Monday, after bidding had hit millions of dollars.Some enterprising college students are applying the eBay concept to items students would want to buy and sell.

February 22, 2005
We asked university presses to tell us about authors under 40 publishing significant works. Our debut is a 24 year old who studied Oprah.

February 22, 2005
A state university system's bid to help undergraduates finish in four years is expected to lead to a boom in "hybrid" distance education.

February 21, 2005
Southern Methodist University holds a special, and ignominious, place in National Collegiate Athletic Association history, as the group's most-punished sports program and the only institution ever to receive the "death penalty."In one fell swoop, the University of Minnesota could become SMU's equal.

February 21, 2005
Faculty panel rejects phasing out the teaching of ancient Greek -- and sees "incalculable" damage from the way cuts were proposed.

February 18, 2005
Measure would create new program for community colleges, though other institutions are eyeing the funds.

February 18, 2005
Bowing to faculty demands, Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers on Thursday released a transcript of his controversial remarks on women and science. He did so while releasing yet another apology for those remarks and as the head of the Harvard Corporation released a statement backing Summers.

February 18, 2005
Colleges have become "dramatically more market-oriented," and risk sacrificing important values to the quest for money, warns a report issued Thursday."Many academic leaders feel compelled to chase revenues and rankings rather than to focus their efforts on providing a high-quality education," says the report, "Correcting Course: How We Can Restore the Ideals of Public Higher Education in a Market-Driven Era," issued by the Futures Project, a higher education research group based at Brown University.

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