Diversity

Diversity
Jul 22, 2016
After a tense summer nationally, and fearing a return of campus protests, college officials call for a peaceful start to the academic year.

Booklets

"Recruitment, Diversity and Success" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

The booklet, which may be downloaded here, features articles on issues related to the recruitment of diverse student bodies and examples of institutional experiments and successes.

Inside Higher Ed's editors will play host to a free webinar to discuss the issues explored in the compilation on Wednesday, June 15, at 2 p.m. Eastern. Click here to register for the webinar or learn more.

The booklet is made possible in part by advertising support from Workday.

Blogs

Minor Details
January 23, 2013 - 10:04pm

When parents, teachers, lawmakers and communities debate over which part of the American education system should receive the most scrutiny or support, adult education, specifically General Educational Development (GED),  is rarely in contention. Conceptually adult education programs serve those who depart school without diplomas and are now seeking a credential to access the workforce or postsecondary opportunities.

Minor Details
September 13, 2012 - 9:21pm

Over the past couple of years the censoring of self-expression has been a hot topic on many campuses. Recently the media washed ashore a new wave of controversy concerning Hampton University’s business school policy that restricts MBA students from wearing their hair in locs (or what is more commonly referred to as “Dread-locs”). This comes on the heels of the brouhaha that developed following the implementation of a written dress code policy at Morehouse College.

Minor Details
August 21, 2012 - 10:18am

In recent years the higher education community has focused more on the role institutions’ play in student success. For a long time the blame for failure has been laid squarely at the feet of students.  If a student dropped out of college it was assumed that they were unmotivated, under-prepared, or lacked the aptitude required to be a college graduate.  The fact that dropouts were admitted meant that they somehow fell through an admissions crack undetected.

Archive

December 2, 2015

Education Trust study finds as institutions' completion rates rise generally, minority students sometimes fall farther behind.

November 30, 2015

Education Department has received more than 1,000 filings on racial harassment in higher ed in last seven years. But only a fraction result in any findings.

November 30, 2015

Student protesters on a number of campuses want to see many more black faculty members. But how realistic are some of their goals?

November 23, 2015

Maryland officials call a proposal to merge a commuter institution with a HBCU a "far-reaching, risky scheme," arguing instead that joint degree programs can better end decades of racial inequity among the state's public colleges.

November 23, 2015

Kansas professor is on leave after students complain over her use of n-word and her statements on retention. Situation is latest to raise issues of racial sensitivity and academic freedom.

November 23, 2015

1,000 complaints to U.S. Education Department in seven years; Brown releases $100 million plan to promote inclusiveness; Occidental sit-in ends after six days.

November 23, 2015

At University of Missouri and William & Mary, some place notes on statues honoring the author of Declaration of Independence, calling him a rapist and a racist.

November 20, 2015

Princeton agrees to consider changing role of Woodrow Wilson name on campus; white student union surfaces (online) at Illinois; black ministers want Kean president to quit; Smith students exclude journalists; Towson president signs list of demands; and more.

November 20, 2015

Demonstrations against racism at two universities were canceled after black students complained about the rallies being organized without their involvement.

November 19, 2015

Princeton becomes flash point in campus protests as students demand end to links to Woodrow Wilson. The same day, institution ends the use of "master" to describe leaders of residential colleges.

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