Diversity

Diversity
Sep 29, 2016
After controversial remarks about reproduction at one conference and gay people at another, scholarly groups consider whether they have an obligation to apologize for what was said or whether doing so constitutes censorship.

Booklets

"Recruitment, Diversity and Success" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

The booklet, which may be downloaded here, features articles on issues related to the recruitment of diverse student bodies and examples of institutional experiments and successes.

Inside Higher Ed's editors will play host to a free webinar to discuss the issues explored in the compilation on Wednesday, June 15, at 2 p.m. Eastern. Click here to register for the webinar or learn more.

The booklet is made possible in part by advertising support from Workday.

Blogs

Minor Details
January 23, 2013 - 10:04pm

When parents, teachers, lawmakers and communities debate over which part of the American education system should receive the most scrutiny or support, adult education, specifically General Educational Development (GED),  is rarely in contention. Conceptually adult education programs serve those who depart school without diplomas and are now seeking a credential to access the workforce or postsecondary opportunities.

Minor Details
September 13, 2012 - 9:21pm

Over the past couple of years the censoring of self-expression has been a hot topic on many campuses. Recently the media washed ashore a new wave of controversy concerning Hampton University’s business school policy that restricts MBA students from wearing their hair in locs (or what is more commonly referred to as “Dread-locs”). This comes on the heels of the brouhaha that developed following the implementation of a written dress code policy at Morehouse College.

Minor Details
August 21, 2012 - 10:18am

In recent years the higher education community has focused more on the role institutions’ play in student success. For a long time the blame for failure has been laid squarely at the feet of students.  If a student dropped out of college it was assumed that they were unmotivated, under-prepared, or lacked the aptitude required to be a college graduate.  The fact that dropouts were admitted meant that they somehow fell through an admissions crack undetected.

Archive

December 11, 2015

Rutgers faculty members, citing philosophical concerns and errors, are pushing back against the use of Academic Analytics to evaluate their productivity.

December 8, 2015

U of Maryland will rename stadium that honored longtime (and strongly racist) president; black professor at MassArt describes being detained by police officers; object on Illinois quad creates concerns for black students; new demands for change at Harvard Law.

December 8, 2015

Many student groups are changing their names to use "Latinx" instead of "Latino" and "Latina."

December 7, 2015

Woman who sent controversial email about Halloween costumes -- and faced uproar over it -- decides to stop teaching at Yale University.

December 7, 2015

U of Tennessee's advice on holiday parties sets off major political debate in the state, and criticism is spreading to other institutions. Some see a broader attack on diversity efforts.

December 3, 2015

When professors leave one job due to sexual harassment allegations, they can land new jobs and repeat the behavior elsewhere, a recent case involving the University of Delaware and San Diego State University suggests.

December 3, 2015

The number and complexity of students' demands of administrations is going up -- and some of the items deal with issues typically left to faculty governance.

December 2, 2015

Threat against black students at Kean turns out to have been hoax; Harvard drops use of title "master" for leaders of residential colleges; 12-day Brandeis sit-in ends; a Kentucky legend defends mural that was covered up.

December 2, 2015

Education Trust study finds as institutions' completion rates rise generally, minority students sometimes fall farther behind.

November 30, 2015

Education Department has received more than 1,000 filings on racial harassment in higher ed in last seven years. But only a fraction result in any findings.

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