Diversity

Diversity
Sep 29, 2016
After controversial remarks about reproduction at one conference and gay people at another, scholarly groups consider whether they have an obligation to apologize for what was said or whether doing so constitutes censorship.

Booklets

"Recruitment, Diversity and Success" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

The booklet, which may be downloaded here, features articles on issues related to the recruitment of diverse student bodies and examples of institutional experiments and successes.

Inside Higher Ed's editors will play host to a free webinar to discuss the issues explored in the compilation on Wednesday, June 15, at 2 p.m. Eastern. Click here to register for the webinar or learn more.

The booklet is made possible in part by advertising support from Workday.

Blogs

Minor Details
January 23, 2013 - 10:04pm

When parents, teachers, lawmakers and communities debate over which part of the American education system should receive the most scrutiny or support, adult education, specifically General Educational Development (GED),  is rarely in contention. Conceptually adult education programs serve those who depart school without diplomas and are now seeking a credential to access the workforce or postsecondary opportunities.

Minor Details
September 13, 2012 - 9:21pm

Over the past couple of years the censoring of self-expression has been a hot topic on many campuses. Recently the media washed ashore a new wave of controversy concerning Hampton University’s business school policy that restricts MBA students from wearing their hair in locs (or what is more commonly referred to as “Dread-locs”). This comes on the heels of the brouhaha that developed following the implementation of a written dress code policy at Morehouse College.

Minor Details
August 21, 2012 - 10:18am

In recent years the higher education community has focused more on the role institutions’ play in student success. For a long time the blame for failure has been laid squarely at the feet of students.  If a student dropped out of college it was assumed that they were unmotivated, under-prepared, or lacked the aptitude required to be a college graduate.  The fact that dropouts were admitted meant that they somehow fell through an admissions crack undetected.

Archive

June 24, 2016

The Supreme Court ruling on Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, is disappointing, writes Roger Clegg, but it leaves plenty of room for future challenges to racial preference policies.

June 22, 2016

University of Arizona has added faculty lines and a journal, and is planning a major conference and a master's program.

June 20, 2016

AAUP sessions center on faculty members' role and responsibilities regarding classroom conversations about race.

June 9, 2016

At many colleges, new assistant professors earn close to or even more than long timers. U of Washington is trying to do something about it -- and finding out how hard it is. Among other ideas: countering expensive retention raises with new salary steps subject to approval by one's peers.

June 9, 2016

When colleges say they prioritize inclusive environments, what do they mean? A new survey hopes to cut through the noise.

June 8, 2016

Former Stanford swimmer is but the latest example of university athletes accused of assaulting women who seem to escape punishments that are serious enough for their crimes.

June 3, 2016

The last five campus leaders picked at Cal State have been women, and recent hires have doubled the number of Asian-Americans who will be campus presidents.

June 1, 2016

Colleges that accommodate transgender students by letting them choose preferred names and pronouns find their efforts hindered by out-of-date software and federal reporting requirements.

May 24, 2016

Colleges around the country are adding facilities and adopting policies designed to help transgender students.

May 24, 2016

Colleges are asking if there's still a place on campus for student groups with limits on who may join.

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