Technology

Technology
Aug 10, 2017
Leaked Google memo, described as an “anti-diversity screed,” reminds many women in STEM fields of the challenges that remain not just in industry, but in academe.
May 31, 2017
The biggest challenge in the University of Arizona's efforts to consolidate its digital assets was getting organized. 

Surveys

Oct. 24, 2016 -- Inside Higher Ed's fifth annual Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology explores the views of professors (and a corresponding group of academic technology administrators) on a range of technology issues.

Among them: the value (and validity) of data produced by student learning assessments, the quality of online education, and the shape of the scholarly publishing landscape.

Inside Higher Ed's 2016 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology was conducted in conjunction with researchers from Gallup. Inside Higher Ed regularly surveys key higher ed professionals on a range of topics.

On Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 2 p.m. Eastern, Inside Higher Ed will present a free webinar to discuss the results of the survey. Register for the webinar here.

The Inside Higher Ed Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology was made possible in part with support from Barnes & Noble College, Explorance, Knowlura, Mediasite by Sonic Foundry, and VitalSource.

Booklets

"New Directions in Online Education" is a new compilation of articles and essays from Inside Higher Ed.

The print-on-demand booklet can be downloaded here, free.

Inside Higher Ed’s editors will conduct a free webcast on the themes of the booklet on Thursday, Sept. 7, at 2 p.m. Eastern. Click here to register.

This booklet was made possible in part by the advertising support of Pearson.

Blogs

Library Babel Fish
August 17, 2017 - 7:22am

How can libraries enact their values in the wake of Charlottesville? Can we impart those values to our students?

Technology and Learning
August 17, 2017 - 3:05am

Costs, not assets.

Technology and Learning
August 17, 2017 - 9:00pm

Passionate opinions about the company that puts books, including this book, in our ears.

Archive

December 3, 2010
Utah authorities investigate allegations that public colleges rigged searches for lecture capture technology.
November 29, 2010

On campus and in Congress, the quest to stop rude online attacks on students may be easier said than done.

November 18, 2010

Maybe money can’t buy happiness. But can it buy friendliness?

Columbia University is hoping it can. The Office of Residential Programs at the university, sensing that its campus had grown too introverted, this week has tried to encourage casual interactions among students with a game, called “The Social Experiment,” aimed at getting campus strangers to talk to each other. The winner gets $500.

November 16, 2010

Online college enrollments grew by 21 percent to 5.6 million last fall, the biggest percentage increase in several years, according to a report released today by the Sloan Consortium and the Babson Survey Research Group.

At the same time, the authors say online growth might begin to slow down in the near future, as the biggest drivers of enrollment growth face budget challenges and stricter recruitment oversight from the federal government.

November 12, 2010

At a time when online education is seen as both a boon for cash-strapped colleges and universities and a crucial piece of the nation’s access and completion goals, institutions that are being sluggish about growing their online programs have no one to blame but themselves.

November 10, 2010
Pearson plans to join small group of providers selling online courses aimed at instructors shifting to digital environment.
November 9, 2010
With a chorus of influential voices calling for colleges to enroll and successfully graduate more students, data analytics is center stage.
November 8, 2010
Deluge of information can be distracting, but can Twitter be used to focus students' attention?
November 5, 2010
At Sloan-C, academics discuss when fostering social intimacy in the online classroom environment is necessary, and when it might distract from more basic student needs.
November 4, 2010

Reflecting on the recent The Humanities and Technology conference (THAT Camp) in San Francisco, what strikes me most is that digital humanities events consistently tip more toward the logic-structured digital side of things. That is, they are less balanced out by the humanities side. But what I mean by that itself has been a problem I've been mulling for some time now. What is the missing contribution from the humanities?

I think this digital dominance revolves around two problems.

Pages

Back to Top