Teaching With Technology

Teaching With Technology
Nov 16, 2016
IBM picks Blackboard and Pearson to bring the technology behind the Watson computer to colleges and universities.

Surveys

Oct. 24, 2016 -- Inside Higher Ed's fifth annual Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology explores the views of professors (and a corresponding group of academic technology administrators) on a range of technology issues.

Among them: the value (and validity) of data produced by student learning assessments, the quality of online education, and the shape of the scholarly publishing landscape.

Inside Higher Ed's 2016 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology was conducted in conjunction with researchers from Gallup. Inside Higher Ed regularly surveys key higher ed professionals on a range of topics.

On Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 2 p.m. Eastern, Inside Higher Ed will present a free webinar to discuss the results of the survey. Register for the webinar here.

The Inside Higher Ed Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology was made possible in part with support from Barnes & Noble College, Explorance, Knowlura, Mediasite by Sonic Foundry, and VitalSource.

Booklets

“Innovation in Teaching” in Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

The PDF booklet includes articles by Inside Higher Ed's reporters and essays by contributors from the field.

A copy of the free booklet may be downloaded here.

And on Tuesday, May 24, at 2 p.m. Eastern, Inside Higher Ed's editors will present a free webinar about the themes of the booklet. Click here to register or find out more.

The compilation was made possible in part by advertising support from D2L.

Blogs

Hack (Higher) Education
April 16, 2013 - 8:35pm

A book review, of sorts, of Kio Stark's Don't Go Back to School, along with the larger "don't go to college" narratives.

Hack (Higher) Education
March 22, 2013 - 12:18pm

What impact has all the hype and interest in MOOCs had on open courseware initiatives, specifically those at MIT?

Hack (Higher) Education
December 28, 2012 - 10:07am

The last in my series reviewing the year's most important ed-tech trends...

Archive

April 8, 2014

This month's edition of The Pulse podcast features an interview with Charley Miller, head of product at TouchCast, a new video production software.

Miller talks with Rodney B. Murray, host of The Pulse. They discuss how TouchCast differs from other video editors and its possible uses in the classroom.

March 20, 2014

Writing professors find themselves playing a critical and unexpected role in the education of veterans.

March 6, 2014

A survey of freshmen finds that while most high school students use online education websites on their own time, very few see fully online courses in their higher education future.

March 3, 2014

Despite the growth of online education, some colleges -- especially small liberal arts institutions -- have absolute bans on credit for such work. Some are starting to consider a shift.

February 18, 2014

This month's edition of The Pulse podcast features an interview with Claudia Reuter, founder and CEO of SchoolChapters, which produces the Pruvalu electronic portfolio.

Reuter talks with Rodney B. Murray, host of The Pulse, about how colleges and universities are using Pruvalu for such purposes as institutional accreditation, assessment of student learning and faculty development.

February 18, 2014

Two years and twice as many iterations later, MOOC instructors at Stanford U. say they are finally seeing results.

January 13, 2014

Electronic advising systems have plenty of potential, writes Melinda Mechur Karp. But they will fall short without more attention to the messy, human side educational technology.

October 8, 2013

UniversityNow signs up more than 1,000 students for low-cost, competency-based degree programs without the lure of federal financial aid. 

August 15, 2013

In report to faculty and students, UT president outlines principles for online education and asks for greater input from professors. 

July 18, 2013

San Jose State's experiment with MOOC provider attracted enormous attention when it was launched. But students didn't do as well as they did in traditional classes.

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