Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - 3:00am

With Newt Gingrich's poll numbers falling, he wasn't able to answer a barrage of political advertisements from his critics. But The New York Times noted that one of the ads on the airwaves that linked Gingrich to the evangelical movement wasn't paid for by Gingrich's campaign, but by Liberty University, which ran an ad spot in which Gingrich talks of his respect for the university. The ad is all about Liberty, but is running at a time that Gingrich would appear to benefit from associations with prominent religious institutions.

 

 

The article noted that some are wondering whether this move amounts to an endorsement of Gingrich -- an endorsement inconsistent with the laws governing nonprofit organizations. A Liberty University statement said that the ad was not an endorsement. "The ad was filmed October 27, 2010 and has been running since that time in various markets. Liberty University has a rotation of ads in its national advertising campaign and it adjusts the mix from time to time," said the statement.

Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - 3:00am

Average grades have fallen at King's College of the University of Cambridge, and officials say that's because of the high level of involvement of students in protesting the British government's plans for higher education, Times Higher Education reported. Among Cambridge's colleges, King's fell to 20th from 14th (out of 29) in grades. The provost, Ross Harrison, said that the reason was protest. Undergraduates "flung themselves into resistance," he said. and "some of the most active political performers descended in their results as compared with last year."

 

Wednesday, January 4, 2012 - 4:24am

A trial started Maryland on a suit by supporters of Maryland's historically black colleges who say that the state is failing to meet its obligations to them, The Washington Post reported. Under past desegregation agreements, the state pledged to enhance the colleges so they could compete for all kinds of students in an era when predominantly white colleges recruit black students. The plaintiffs argue that the state has been too slow to build up programs at the black colleges, while state officials argue that black colleges have seen larger increases in state support than have other institutions.

 

 

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

Kevin Gausepohl resigned as a music instructor at Tacoma Community College after being told that officials were investigating charges that he told a student to strip because she could reach lower octaves by singing while naked or performing sexual acts, The News Tribune reported. The student was 17 years old at the time, and enrolled in a dual program with a local high school. Other students told authorities that they received similar requests from the instructor, who cited a study on which he said he was working as the need for the unusual singing arrangement. The other students, unlike the 17-year-old, did not comply. The instructor denies wrongdoing. He is facing seven counts of communicating with a minor for immoral purposes and one count of obstructing a law enforcement officer, according to court records.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

The "block plan," in which students take one course at a time for a few weeks, rather than four or five courses over a semester, is attracting interest in Canada, The Globe and Mail reported. Quest University has adopted the system and three institutions -- Acadia University,  Algoma University and the University of Northern British Columbia -- have started to explore the use of block schedules. Among the small number of institutions in the United States that use the system are Colorado, Cornell (Iowa) and Tusculum Colleges.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

While some mark the New Year by noting words that are annoying, Wayne State University issues a list of words that are "regrettably neglected." This year's list: antediluvian, erstwhile, execrable, frisson, parlous, penultimate, Sisyphean, supercilious, transmogrify and truckle. Details on the words may be found here.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Miami has agreed to pay $83,000 to a bankruptcy trustee to cover the costs of gifts made by Nevin Shapiro, a one-time booster of athletic programs who is now in jail over a Ponzi scheme that among other things financed his gifts to various Miami athletes, The Miami Herald reported. The deal states that the trustee will not seek to recover additional funds from the athletes and former athletes, meaning that they will not be forced to publicly discuss the gifts. Those gifts are believed to have included Cadillac Escalades, jewelry, party invites, champagne, lap dances and the services of prostitutes.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

Governor Steve Beshear of Kentucky has stopped a controversial merger between the University of Louisville's teaching hospital and a Roman Catholic health system. The idea for the merger provoked an uproar in the state last year. Beshear cited loss of public control over the hospital as a main reason for rejecting the merger, which he said had more risks than benefits, The Courier-Journal reported. The merger was controversial because the hospitals would all have had to follow Catholic health directives, including restrictions on abortion and sterilization, and some groups feared they would interfere with medical education at the public institution.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

Israel's Academy of Sciences and Humanities organized a meeting last week at which hundreds of Israeli academics living abroad, as well as Jewish academics in other countries considering a move to Israel, met with representatives of Israeli universities, Ynet News reported. The event was part of an expanded effort in Israel to reverse its brain drain problem. More than 2,000 Israeli academics abroad (a majority of them in the United States) have told academy officials that they are interested in returning to Israel. Those who return will be eligible for tax breaks and other benefits.

Tuesday, January 3, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Robert Pallitto of Seton Hall University explains that the U.S. government’s approach to torture has changed little in the last century. (And while you're there, here was Monday's Academic Minute, in which the College of Saint Rose's Silvia Mejia discusses how advances in digital technology are allowing emigrants to maintain ties to home and family like never before.) Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

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