Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

March 5, 2014

Fabrice Tourre, the former Goldman Sachs trader known as "Fabulous Fab" and as someone found liable for defrauding investors, won't be teaching economics to undergraduates at the University of Chicago. While he had been scheduled to do so, The Wall Street Journal reported that Chicago has yanked that course away from him. Tourre is a Ph.D. student at the university, and he will instead fulfill his teaching assignments with graduate courses.

 

March 5, 2014

Managers, chefs and other employees of the dining service at Cornell University are on special diets this week. To understand the dining needs of different groups of students, the dining officials are eating breakfast, lunch and dinner in different campus facilities, and are adhering to various diets: vegetarian, vegan, kosher, dairy-free, gluten-free and both dairy- and gluten-free. Officials want to see the challenges of adhering to different diets in various campus dining halls.

March 5, 2014

In today's Academic Minute, Ken Sheldon, professor of psychology at the University of Missouri, explains why many professional athletes have trouble living up to expectations after the deal is signed. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

March 5, 2014

Pennsylvania State University on Tuesday announced plans to auction off some of its intellectual property. Like most research universities, Penn State holds patent rights on many inventions, and many of these patents haven't been taken to market in a meaningful way with new products or services. Penn State believes that its auction is the first of its kind and could provide the university with revenue and allow more patents to be used to their fullest potential.

 

March 5, 2014

The National Coalition Against Censorship -- which includes numerous academic groups -- has written to Kennesaw State University to demand the restoration of an installation that administrators ordered removed from an exhibit last week. The installation was about land once owned by Corra Harris (1869-1935), who was a prominent author and whose homestead the university accepted as a gift to preserve in 2009 -- over the objections of some faculty members. Part of the installation dealt with a racist letter Harris wrote -- a letter that launched her careers and that has had her identified ever since as an apologist for lynching. The university said that the installation was ordered removed from an exhibit in the new art museum at Kennesaw State because the work was "not aligned with the celebratory atmosphere of the museum’s opening."

The letter from the National Coalition Against Censorship says in part: "The removal of Ruth Stanford's [the artist's] work is not only a missed educational opportunity, it also raises serious constitutional concerns. As a public educational institution, Kennesaw State has an obligation under the First Amendment not to discriminate against particular ideas, no matter how controversial they might be."

A spokeswoman for the university said that she did not know of a response from the institution.

 

March 4, 2014

Private college leaders in Tennessee want to make sure a proposal to provide free community college doesn't affect their students' wallets. The Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association says Governor Bill Haslam's free community college plan works by redistributing state aid money away from some four-year college students. Under the governor's plan, money to increase the aid to community college students would come by reducing aid to first-year and sophomore four-year college students. The private college plan would prevent those cuts to first and second-year four-year college students by rearranging other aid money and starting an endowment for community college aid.

March 4, 2014

The University of Northern Virginia doesn't sound like an institution to find in South Dakota. But the for-profit institution has relocated there, the Associated Press reported. Virginia authorities shut it down, citing a lack of accreditation, but now it has an address in South Dakota, seen by many as lax in regulating for-profit higher education. Northern Virginia officials could not be reached for comment.

 

March 4, 2014

In today's Academic Minute, Michael Bruno, dean and professor of engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, reveals how imaging technology can be used to educate and inform residence in the path of future storms. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

March 4, 2014

A high school senior in New Jersey is suing her parents to try to force them to commit to paying her college tuition, The Daily Record reported. The student maintains that she was kicked out of the house, while her parents say that she is welcome to live at home if she will abide by their rules. They don't like her boyfriend. The suit seeks to require the parents to treat her as dependent, even after the age of 18, and argues that it need not be the case that parents can stop supporting those who reach 18. The student has been admitted -- with some scholarship funds -- to the University of Vermont, William Paterson University, Lynn University and Wells College. But the suit says she could not enroll without parental help or significant borrowing.

 

March 4, 2014

The board of the University of West Alabama has placed President Richard Holland on leave, and voted not to renew his contract, The Tuscaloosa News reported. The move came just after Holland asked the board to investigate whether a trustee inappropriately sought to influence the board's review of his performance, the News reported. According to Holland, the trustee worked with two senior administrators to identify people who view the president negatively -- so that those individuals' views would be included in the performance review. The trustee declined to comment.

 

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