Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

January 17, 2014

Tucked away on page 1,020 of the 1,582-page spending bill winding its way through Congress, Section 527 of the ‘‘Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014’’ would make taxpayer funded research publicly available within 12 months of publication.

According to the bill, federal agencies must develop public access policies that provide a "machine-readable version of the author’s final peer-reviewed manuscripts that have been accepted for publication in peer-reviewed journal." The policy applies to all federal agencies with research and development expenditures exceeding $100 million a year. The proposal resembles that introduced last year by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, although it is not clear how Congress's involvement would affect the rollout of those policies.

The $1.1 trillion bill, which passed the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday and the Senate on Thursday, is expected to be signed into law.

January 17, 2014

The number of international students from outside the European Union at U.K. universities fell by 1 percent in 2012-13, the first decline since record-keeping began in the mid-'90s, Times Higher Education reported. The number of new Indian students has dropped particularly precipitously, falling by half in just two years. Times Higher Education notes that the new data, released Thursday by the Higher Education Statistics Agency, can be expected to heighten concerns among university leaders about the effects of the government’s push to curb immigration

January 17, 2014

The University of Wyoming's Board of Trustees on Thursday gave Interim President Richard McGinity the job on a permanent basis, seemingly bypassing a university bylaw requiring consultation with a faculty committee, the Casper Star-Tribune reported. McGinity has served as interim president -- effectively, by all accounts -- since the sudden resignation of Robert Sternberg after a truncated and controversial presidency. Some of the trustees -- who approved McGinity's appointment by a 9-to-3 vote -- said they believed the need for institutional stability outweighed the requirement for consultation.

 

January 17, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Melissa Sloan of the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee explores the role of race in determining workplace satisfaction. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

January 17, 2014

A revamped performance funding plan approved Thursday by Florida's higher education governing board could result in some universities having money taken away from them, The Miami Herald reported. State policy makers have increasingly adopted performance funding systems for colleges in recent years, but most such approaches use them to allocate new funds -- taking existing funds away is unusual. Under the new Florida system, which changes an earlier approach, an institution that doesn't score a minimum number of points under the scoring system would lose 1 percent of its funding in 2014-15, in addition to being ineligible for performance funds, the Herald reported.

January 16, 2014

The compromise appropriations bill that has passed the House of Representatives and is awaiting Senate approval does not contain the measure in last year's bill that barred most National Science Foundation support for political science. The ban -- pushed by Republicans who would like to limit NSF support for the social sciences generally -- stunned political scientists. They are hopeful that the current appropriations plan will stay intact.

 

January 16, 2014

About 23 percent of students who receive college credit while still enrolled in high school obtain an associate degree within two years, making them far more likely to do so than peers who do not earn college credit in high school, a new study shows.

Those students attend what are called Early College high schools, which team up with colleges and universities to allow the students to receive up to two years of college credit that can go toward an associate degree. By comparison, only 2 percent of students at high schools without Early College programs went on to receive an associate degree within two years. The study, conducted by the American Institutes for Research, reports that 81 percent of the Early College students enrolled in college, compared to only 72 percent of students who attended other high schools.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the Early College High School Initiative in 2002, to help underserved students earn college degrees. The students were in ninth grade during the 2005-6, 2006-7 or 2007-8 academic years. Some were followed for almost nine years. The new study updates an earlier one, providing an additional year of postsecondary data.

“With the most recent data, all students in the study would have had at least two years after high school to earn an associate’s degree if they progressed on a traditional timeline,” said Andrea Berger, a principal researcher at AIR in a press release.

January 16, 2014

The City University of New York on Wednesday named James B. Milliken, president of the University of Nebraska system, as its next chancellor. Milliken heads the four-campus Nebraska system, which, despite counting a Big Ten research university among its members, has a largely open-access mission, as does CUNY. He previously was a senior administrator at the University of North Carolina system.

Milliken replaces the interim chancellor William P. Kelly, who took that role after Matthew Goldstein retired after 14 years in CUNY's top job.

January 16, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeff Stanton of Syracuse University reveals efforts to represent large data sets using sound. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

January 16, 2014

A branch of Giant, a grocery store chain in the Washington, D.C., region, produced a circular to promote shopping by Howard University students returning to campus from break. The ad ended up offending many Howard students, Washington Business Journal reported, because it features a white woman and Howard is a historically black college. A spokesman for Giant said that "unfortunately an incorrect stock photo was used in the ad and we apologize for this oversight."

Pages

Back to Top