Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 3:00am

A county judge ruled Wednesday that the University of California can release its full report on police officers' controversial use of pepper spray to disperse student protesters last fall, withholding only the names of most of the officers, the San Jose Mercury News reported. The university's police union had sued to block the release of the full report, arguing that some elements of it should remain confidential, as would be the case with the results of a police internal affairs investigation. Judge Evelio Grillo rejected that comparison, but agreed that names and ranks of officers could be withheld to prevent harassment of officers.

A UC statement said that the university would ultimately like to release the officers' names, and that it remained unclear exactly when the report would be made public.

 

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 4:31am

The Roman Catholic group at Vanderbilt University on Wednesday announced that it would become an off-campus ministry rather than staying on campus and trying to comply with a university anti-bias rule that bars all student groups from discriminating on the basis of religion (among other factors), The Tennessean reported. Vanderbilt is among a number of colleges and universities that require all student organizations to be fully open to all students. Some Republican legislators are pushing to bar state student aid from going to such colleges, Nashville Public Radio reported.

 

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 3:00am

The sponsor of legislation that would bar Georgia's public colleges from enrolling students in the United States without legal documentation agreed Wednesday to an amendment that would strip the ban from broader immigration legislation, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The state senator behind the proposed ban, Barry Loudermilk, said the provision on colleges' enrolling illegal immigrants threatened to undermine the broader bill. Officials of the University System of Georgia opposed the measure, saying they had already taken steps to ensure that undocumented students could not enroll in any college that is turning away qualified applicants.

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 3:00am

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, which does significant work on California's community colleges, open educational resources, and other higher education realms, named a new president on Wednesday. And like his predecessor, Larry Kramer is the dean of Stanford University's law school. Kramer succeeds Paul Brest, its president since 2004. As dean at Stanford, Kramer was credited with creating or expanding law centers dedicated to social justice, public service, and international legal training and prodding law students to expand their study of other disciplines.

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Stacey Robertson of Bradley University explains how many of the tactics used by 19th-century abolitionists have been adapted and employed by those seeking to eradicate modern forms of slavery. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 3:00am

Three coaches of teams in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I men's basketball tournament are earning more than $4 million this year, three more earn more than $3 million, and 16 in all are paid more than $2 million, according to a database of coaches' pay published Wednesday by USA Today. The database, which includes information on most of the 68 teams participating in the tournament (except for those at several universities that declined to release the information), is accompanied by articles exploring the issues raised by the coaches' salaries, including how their institutions afford them and the disadvantage that less-wealthy colleges are at in the competition for top coaches.

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 4:23am

Two band faculty members at Florida A&M University were present during hazing of pledges who wanted to join an honorary band fraternity, several students have told authorities, The Orlando Sentinel reported. The hazing allegedly took place at the home of Diron Holloway, a FAMU professor who is director of the marching band's saxophone section, and involved paddling. Holloway and the other faculty member, Anthony Simons, a music professor, could not be reached for comment. The police report detailing the allegations is the latest development in the investigation of a student death last year that appears to be hazing-related. The university has maintained that it has long had a "no tolerance" approach to hazing, a stance undercut by the report of faculty involvement. The report was released Wednesday and both Holloway and Simmons were then placed on leave by the university, The Tallahassee Democrat reported.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 4:34am

A few years ago, a number of community colleges introduced "midnight classes," courses meeting late at night, at a time that works for some working adults (and for institutions without space during peak hours). The Miami Herald reported that Miami Dade College and a few other institutions have started courses that meet at 6 a.m. or 6:30 a.m. For some students, this is the time that they have free. Students report that the courses fit their schedules and it's one time of day that parking is easy to find.

 

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 3:00am

Princeton Review is selling the test-prep business around which a larger education business has grown, and is giving the purchaser -- the private equity firm Charlesbank Capital Partners -- its name, the Associated Press reported. Princeton Review was once the upstart in the test-prep business, boasting of teaching test-takers how to outsmart testing companies, but of late has faced competition both from less expensive outfits and from boutique operations. The company will now focus on its Penn Foster division, a for-profit online education provider; it at one point seemed to be an effort to diversify the company's operations, but now appears to be its focus.

 

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 3:00am

The Washington Internship Institute has selected a Vanderbilt University expert on experiential learning to lead the organization. Mark Taylor Dalhouse, founding director of Vanderbilt's Washington internship program and a lecturer in history and assistant dean at the university, will succeed Mary Ryan as the institute's president and CEO. The internship institute sponsors numerous programs that place American and foreign college students in government and international relations positions.

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