Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

March 7, 2013

State regulators in California have ordered Aristotle University -- an unaccredited institution investigated for preying on foreign students -- to close, NBC San Diego reported. The television station, whose original reporting earlier this year prompted an investigation by the Department of Homeland Security, published a letter in which the state Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education said that Aristotle's founder, Xanthi Gionis, would face $50,000 in fines if he didn't shut the school in two weeks.

 

March 7, 2013

A study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE found evidence of brain injuries that could lead to cognitive issues in college football player -- even in cases where the football players did not suffer concussions. The study was based on analysis of players on three college football teams. The injuries -- which did not involve concussions -- were identified with blood tests to show the potential for blood-brain barrier disruption. The danger took place in cases of "repeated sub-concussive events."

 

March 7, 2013

An article in New York Magazine explores business relationships between Rob Wile, chief of staff to Rev. Donald Harrington, president of St. John's University (New York), Father Harrington, and the former chair of the university's board. Wile received a loan from the former board chair for a real estate venture he was pursuing with Father Harrington. The magazine said that the loan was not reported to the board, even as the board was approving a bonus recommended by Father Harrington for Wile. A university spokesman told the magazine that the real estate venture "has nothing to do with St. John’s." The article quoted Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, a dean at the Yale University School of Management, as calling the loan arrangement "unprecedented" and "unethical."

March 7, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, David Schuff of Temple University explains how your posts to various social media platforms are making traditional political polls obsolete. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
 

March 7, 2013

Several leading corporate scholarship providers are complaining about the rules used by some wealthy colleges for calculating students' expected contributions to their college expenses, Bloomberg reported. Some colleges rescind some or all of their aid offers, and impose minimum student contribution requirements, on those who receive large grants from independent scholarship providers. The colleges' rules, some complain, effectively punish students for winning scholarships. College officials, on the other hand, maintain that the rules treat all students equally and maximize the availability of aid funds.

March 7, 2013

The number of athletics directors at major-college sports programs who make more than $1 million has risen to nine from six since 2011, and the number earning over $800,000 has climbed to 15 from 9, a USA Today analysis finds. Among the highlights of the report, which includes a database of all those institutions that agreed to share data with the newspaper (many private universities did not):

  • The average director earned $515,000 in 2013, up 14 percent from 2011.
  • The University of Texas's athletics director, DeLoss Dodds, gets a $62,500 annual bonus if his department is financially solvent -- not a hard hurdle to clear given its nearly $160 million in annual revenue.
March 7, 2013

The U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights plans to investigate how the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill handles sexual assaults on the campus, the Associated Press reported. The agency said in a March 1 letter that it would conduct an inquiry into a complaint filed on behalf of 64 women in January that alleged, among other things, that said the individuals who run the campus judicial system mistreated victims and that upper-level administrators pressured them to underreport sexual assault statistics to the federal government.

March 7, 2013

It's that time: a new month, a new Cartoon Caption Contest.

Click here to suggest a caption for March's cartoon, the latest drawing by Matthew Henry Hall. The three entries deemed most clever and creative by our experts' panel will be put to a vote by our readers, and the winner will receive a $75 Amazon gift certificate and a signed copy of the cartoon.

Click here to vote on the three captions nominated by our judges as finalists for our February cartoon. 

And congratulations to the winner of our January contest: Aaron J. Moore, director of alumni relations for the California State University System's chancellor's office and executive director of the CSU Alumni Council. Find out more about him and his submission by visiting this link.

March 7, 2013

The University of Michigan will today announce a $50 million gift for its graduate program in writing, AnnArbor.com reported. The gift is believed to be the largest ever for a writing program, and comes at a time that mega-gifts have become much more common for science and business programs than for those in the humanities. The gift is from Helen Zell, a Michigan graduate and longtime supporter of the program.

 

March 7, 2013

Both houses of the Texas Legislature approved a measure Wednesday that would merge two existing institutions to create one university in South Texas, and give the region its first medical school, The Monitor reported. The legislation would formalize a plan hatched late last year by the University of Texas System to merge its Pan American and Brownsville campuses, which are about 60 miles apart, to strengthen the delivery of education in the Rio Grande Valley. The legislation would also create a new medical school to try to address a physician shortage in the region.

 

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