Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Analysis of the manifesto left by Anders Behring Breivik, who has admitted

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal officials have launched a process for a major overhaul of rules governing the protections assured to people who are the subject of research studies, The New York Times reported. The revisions are intended to reflect changes in the research being done and to reduce red tape. Many researchers have historically complained about the cumbersome process for having their projects approved, but some critics have said that more scrutiny is needed of studies involving humans.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal officials have undertaken a process for a major overhaul of rules governing the protections assured to people who are the subject of research studies, The New York Times reported. The revisions are intended to reflect changes in the research being done and to reduce red tape. Many researchers have historically complained about the cumbersome process for having their projects approved, but some critics have said that more scrutiny is needed of studies involving humans.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

California's governor signed legislation on Monday that will let immigrants without legal documentation receive privately funded scholarships to enroll in the state's public colleges, the Los Angeles Times reported. But in discussing the measure, Gov. Jerry Brown declined to commit to signing companion legislation that would let undocumented students get state-financed student aid, saying he viewed it "favorably" but did not want to get out ahead of events, since the bill has not yet reached his desk.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Seth Chandler of the University of Houston examines how
computer technology is poised to change how legislation is written and applied. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Chicago State University officials have been boasting about improvements in retention rates. But an investigation by The Chicago Tribune found that part of the reason is that students with grade-point averages below 1.8 have been permitted to stay on as students, in violation of university rules. Chicago State officials say that they have now stopped the practice, which the Tribune exposed by requesting the G.P.A.'s of a cohort of students. Some of the students tracked had G.P.A.'s of 0.0.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Kaplan Inc. has agreed to pay $1.6 million to settle three legal matters at the company's CHE Institute, in Pennsylviania, including a whistleblower's suit charging that the campus enrolled students in a surgical technology program without having enough clinical placements for the students to graduate, The New York Times reported. About $500,000 in the settlement will repay student loans of those enrolled in the program. Kaplan did not admit any wrongdoing. About $225,000 will go to settle the whistleblower's suit.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Atlantic Union College has issued layoff notices to all employees, effective July 31, The Worcester Telegram & Gazette reported. The college, in Massachusetts, has been in the process of becoming a branch of Washington Adventist University, in Maryland. But delays by Massachusetts officials in approving the merger have left Atlantic Union without the resources to continue, without the authority to merge. Had the merger gone through, layoffs were projected to be minimal.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Teenagers who are members of various minority faiths in Britain are more likely to end up enrolled in a university than are Christians, according to a new government study, TES reported. Among those who as teenagers identify as Hindus, 77 percent end up in a university. The figure for Sikhs is 63 percent, while the figure for Muslims is 53 percent. Those groups were lagged by Christians (45 percent) and those who said they did not have a faith (32 percent).

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

A church in Arizona and one in Kentucky are suing one another over the sale of an apparently unaccredited for-profit online university, The Louisville Courier-Journal reported. The suits say that Child of the King Ministries, in Louisville, sold the institution to Church for the Nations, in Phoenix, last year. Child of the King says that Church for the Nations isn't making the required payments. But Church for the Nations says that Child of the King made false claims about the university, including that it had accreditation, was affiliated with various other educational institutions, and had a base of foreign students who wanted an American degree.

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