Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

Mexican authorities on Monday raided three teachers colleges in the state of Michoacan, where students have been hijacking buses and trucks to protest changes in the curriculum, the Associated Press reported. In clashes Monday, 176 protesters -- who have been trying to take over the campuses -- were detained, and 10 police offers were injured.

 

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

This month the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges issued a report calling on trustees to meet their responsibilities for making sure athletics programs are run with integrity, consistent with the educational values of their institutions. It's not clear that all trustees have read the report about where they should focus their attention. The Tampa Bay Times used open-records requests to obtain the e-mail message John Ramil, the board chair of the University of South Florida, sent out after USF lost a football game to Temple University. "Disgusting and unacceptable. We have major problems with our football program," he wrote in an e-mail to the president's chief of staff. That e-mail in turn was forwarded to the athletics director, with a suggestion that he have a talk with the board chair. Asked about the e-mail, Ramil told the newspaper that "I was expressing the same feeling of frustration as all the USF fans are feeling.... I personally want what's best for all the USF programs, whether academic or sports. I also believe in candid feedback, and I think the president and the athletic director and the coaches need to have that kind of feeling of feedback from all the fans. I've given them feedback on good stuff, too."

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association followed through last Monday on its vow to bar the staging of championship events in New Jersey, citing the state's passage in July of a law that permits sports gambling. NCAA policies prohibit the association from holding events in any state that allows betting on individual college games, and there were five regional and national championships planned for the state in this academic year. “Consistent with our policies and beliefs, the law in New Jersey requires that we no longer host championships in the state," said Mark Lewis, NCAA executive vice president of championships and alliances. "We will work hard in the days ahead to find new suitable host locations which will allow the student-athletes to have the best possible competitive experience.”

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

Blackboard announced Monday that Michael Chasen will be stepping down as its CEO at the end of the year. He will be succeeded by Jay Bhatt, who is president and CEO of Progress Software. Chasen was the co-founder of Blackboard in 1997, and saw huge growth in the company's size and influence in higher education. The company dominates the learning management system market, and has also seen its share of controversies while gaining that position and acquiring many other companies in related fields. Chasen posted this open letter about the change.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

Upcoming changes to income-based repayment for student loans will benefit graduate students with high debt and high salaries, according to a new report from the New America Foundation. The report, "Safety Net or Windfall?", argues that changes to the income-based repayment system, which will lower monthly payments to 10 percent of a borrower's income (down from 15 percent) and confer loan forgiveness after 20 years (down from 25 years), will encourage graduate schools to increase tuition because high-debt borrowers might not have to repay all of their loans. Low-income borrowers will see only a modest benefit, write the report's authors, Jason Delisle and Alex Holt of the Federal Education Budget Project. They suggest maintaining the new benefits only for borrowers with income at less than 300 percent of the poverty line.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating Bridgepoint Education Inc. over the compensation of admissions staff members, the company announced Monday in a corporate filing. The for-profit is also facing a serious accreditation challenge for its Ashford University, which is scrambling to retain regional accreditation.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 4:18am

Some university presses are fighting off cuts, but the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism on Monday announced that it is launching a new academic press. Beginning in 2013, the press will release three to five books a year related to journalism. The press will be operated with OR Books, an independent publisher that focuses on e-books and print-on-demand.

 

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, David Bottjer of the University of Southern California reveals how past periods of global warming caused mass extinctions and how similar patterns are appearing in the oceans today. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Sylvester Oliver, who was until recently a professor and director of humanities at Rust College, is in jail facing charges that he raped a student, WREG News reported. Investigators said that the allegations stem from an incident a month ago, but that the student came forward two weeks later. David L. Beckley, president of the college, said via e-mail that the case is in the hands of the police department, but that Oliver "is no longer employed" by the college.

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Wyoming said it removed a controversial sculpture from campus on schedule and because of water damage. But The Casper Star-Tribune, based on e-mail records it obtained, said that the schedule was moved up amid concern about how the sculpture was offending the coal industry, legislators and donors. The large sculpture, "Carbon Sink: What Goes Around, Comes Around," featured coal and wood sinking into the earth, and was viewed by many as anti-coal. The e-mail records show university officials worried about the fallout from those criticizing the sculpture, and reaching out to let them know that the work was being removed. The e-mails also show considerable anger over the sculpture. An e-mail from Bruce Hinchey, president of the Petroleum Association of Wyoming, said: "The next time the University of Wyoming is asking for donations it might be helpful to remind them of this and other things they have done to the industries that feed them before you donate.... They always hide behind academic freedom but their policies and actions can change if they so choose."

 

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