Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 3:00am

The college commission of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools placed two colleges on probation and imposed lesser sanctions against numerous others during its just-concluded meeting in Orlando -- with many of the accreditors' actions related to financial woes. A prominent exception is the commission's decision to impose a six-month probation on Our Lady of the Holy Cross, which was investigated outside the regular accreditation review cycle after the order of nuns that governs the nonprofit corporation that controls the college abruptly dismissed its Board of Regents and its president in August. SACS cited violations of several of its standards related to governance and external influence, said Belle S. Wheelan, the accreditor's president, who added, "We just don't know who's running the place right now." A spokesman for the college, Stephen Morgan, said the community of Marianite nuns had scuttled the board because the regents were deeply, and irreconcilably, divided over the performance of Holy Cross's former president, the Rev. Anthony De Conciliis. He said college officials were confident that they ultimately could explain to the Southern accreditor why the corporation board's actions were legitimate under SACS's policies on tiers of governance. Morgan acknowledged that the accreditor's action could affect the enrollment of students potentially transferring to Holy Cross.

In other actions at its meeting, the Southern accreditor placed Florida Christian College on probation, citing standards related to financial stability and resources. It also warned numerous other colleges because of concerns about their financial states and/or their overemphasis on part-time professors, including Edward Waters College, Fisk University, Fort Valley State University, Greensboro College, Lon Morris College, Louisiana College, Montreat College, Mount Olive College, Savannah State University, Stillman College, Texas State Technical College-Harlingen, and Virginia Intermont College.

The Southern accreditor also removed four institutions from probation: Bennett College for Women, Notre Dame Seminary (La.), Sul Ross State University, and the University of West Alabama, and dropped several institutions from warning status, including Barton, Brescia, Carson Newman, Criswell, and Miami Dade Colleges, Pamlico Community College, South Plains College, Tennessee State University and Texas A&M University-Commerce.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Steve Anderson of the University of Northern Colorado explains how researching volcanism here on Earth can shed light on similar processes elsewhere in the solar system. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 4:26am

Jon Huntsman has tried to stand out in the Republican presidential field by, among other things, arguing that scientists should be trusted on issues such as evolution and climate change. Huntsman also has yet to experience a surge in his standing in the race. The Washington Post and others speculate that the latter fact may explain an evolution of Huntsman's position on climate change. After earlier saying that Republicans cannot be seen as the "anti-science party," he is now questioning whether researchers have demonstrated the validity of climate change. "There are questions about the validity of the science — evidence by one university over in Scotland recently,” he said Tuesday, referring to the leaked e-mail messages that were dubbed a scandal but that several scientific inquiries have said don't change the consensus that climate change is real. Huntsman denied he was changing his position about trusting scientists, but said that “I think the onus is on the scientific community to provide more in the way of information, to help clarify the situation. That’s all."

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 3:00am

Under pressure from state lawmakers, the central administration of the State University of New York system backed off a plan to have one president oversee two campuses, though system administrators stressed that the decision would not keep the campuses from putting cost-saving administrative structures in place. The system announced in August that three pairs of campuses would share presidencies, part of a larger initiative designed to stimulate regional cost-saving initiatives. The announcement spurred particular backlash at one pair of institutions -- SUNY-Potsdam and SUNY-Canton -- and drove one state representative, whose district includes the campuses, to introduce a bill that would guarantee each campus had its own president.

The other two pairs will move ahead with unified presidencies. According to a resolution passed in November, the campuses, including Potsdam and Canton, have until July 15, 2012, to produce a report about how they will meet certain cost-savings goals. "Chancellor Zimpher and the SUNY Board of Trustees decided this was more important than allowing one hurdle to distract from our efforts to channel more funding to our academic courses, which has always been our goal, and remains our goal," said a spokesman for the chancellor's office. "There will still be a consolidation of the administrative structure at Canton and Potsdam."

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 4:28am

The University of California at San Diego has agreed to expand library hours -- including 24/7 hours in the main library during finals week -- following student protests that involved taking over a closed library, NBC San Diego reported. University administrators responded to the building take-over in part by removing police officers from the scene, hoping to avoid confrontations that have been so controversial at the University of California's Berkeley and Davis campuses, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. Students, while they were arguably occupying a space, tried to differentiate themselves from the Occupy movement. The students said they were focused on their need for room to study, and they said that they were "reclaiming," not "occupying" the library.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011 - 3:00am

Faculty members at Ocean County College are protesting a tenure denial they say was based on the professor involved living in another county, The Asbury Park Press reported. Maria Flynn, who was denied tenure despite outstanding reviews, said that she was told by President Jon H. Larson that he rejected her tenure bid because she lives elsewhere. Faculty leaders said that such a policy would violate college rules, and was inappropriate. Larson did not comment on whether he is considering residency in making tenure decisions.

 

Tuesday, December 6, 2011 - 4:17am

Authorities in Vancouver continue to investigate an incident in which a student meeting at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, in British Columbia, was interrupted by people who released substances believed to be pepper spray, and some students needed medical assistance, The Vancouver Sun reported. The meeting was being held to oust the student government, and the chemicals were released just before a quorum was reached.

 

Tuesday, December 6, 2011 - 4:22am

Israel's Council for Higher Education has passed a series of reform proposals designed to assure higher levels of competence in English by university graduates, Ynet News reported. The changes raise the scores required in English on entrance requirements and also require more instruction in English while enrolled at universities.

 

Tuesday, December 6, 2011 - 4:28am

Cardiff University, in Wales, is running a "free tuition for life" contest being compared to the "golden tickets" offered by the fictional Willy Wonka or the competitions of allegedly real "reality" television shows. The university will be unveiling a series of challenges that need to be completed, leading to a live challenge at the university. The winner will not be charged tuition for any program for the rest of his or her life -- and can enroll in an unlimited number of undergraduate and multiple graduate degree programs. Applicants must be from Britain or other European Union countries.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Fans of the University of Connecticut and others are debating a new practice there of asking those attending home football and basketball games to say the pledge of allegiance to the flag before the traditional playing of the national anthem, The New York Times reported. While some see the pledge as a welcome sign of patriotism and unity, others question a public university asking people to say anything with the words "under God" and note concerns for international athletes.

 

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