Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, February 9, 2012 - 3:00am

California's Legislative Analyst's Office issued an extensive report Wednesday that praised some aspects of Governor Jerry Brown's plan to finance higher education in 2012-13 but said the proposal could "unduly" curtail student access and would limit the legislature's right to set budgets for different types of institutions. The analysis says that the governor's plan to impose grade point average requirements on the receipt of some state student aid and to cut need-based aid for students at private institutions would "unreasonably harm access" to postsecondary education. The analyst's office also proposes changes to the program that grants fee waivers to community college students, and notes that the plan would impose devastating cuts on the three systems of public higher education if voters do not approve a tax increase in November.

Thursday, February 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Northern Essex Community College has taken an unusual approach to sharing its new strategic plan with various constituents: it is using a theme song. Jeff Bickford, chief information officer at the institution, wrote and performed the song, now available on YouTube:

 

 

 

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

The American Federation of Teachers Executive Council on Tuesday reaffirmed a commitment to collaborating with the American Association of University Professors on advocacy efforts and union organizing. The announcement extends a relationship created in 2008 as part of an effort to bring more faculty members -- especially at research universities -- into collective bargaining. The joint effort resulted in a big win with the unionization of faculty members at the University of Illinois at Chicago (although the university is challenging the win). Currently, the AFT and AAUP are jointly organizing faculty members at the University of Oregon.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

An investigation by The Washington Post has revealed many millions in earmarks -- grants made by members of Congress to specific institutions, bypassing peer review -- that have gone to colleges that employ close relatives of the lawmakers who obtained the funds, or who have such relatives on their boards. For example, Representative Robert Aderholt, an Alabama Republican, helped get about $440,000 for the University of Montevallo while his wife was on its board. Or there's Representative Robert E. Andrews, a New Jersey Democrat, who won $3.3 million over the last 10 years for a scholarship program at the Rutgers University School of Law in Camden, where his wife is an associate dean in charge of scholarships. And Rep. Robert E. Latta, an Ohio Republican, co-sponsored earmarks worth $2.8 million for Bowling Green State University while his wife was a senior vice president there.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 4:26am

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett, a Republican, on Tuesday proposed cutting the state's higher education budget by 30 percent, on top of a 20 percent reduction approved last year, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Democratic legislators and faculty unions denounced the proposed cuts and said that they would lead to significant tuition increases, but some Republican legislative leaders said that it was time to focus on whether the state has too many campuses.

 

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Amid an ongoing furor over the Obama administration's decision to require Roman Catholic colleges, hospitals and other religious employers to offer health insurance plans covering birth control at no cost, a senior adviser to the president's re-election campaign suggested Tuesday that compromise might be possible. On the MSNBC program "Morning Joe," David Axelrod, a top campaign adviser, said the White House would look for "a way to move forward that both provides women with the preventative care that they need and respects the prerogatives of religious institutions,"  The New York Times reported.

Religious institutions' objections were well-known before the final rule was issued in January. But the contraception coverage requirement has become a feature of the Republican presidential campaign, with Mitt Romney, considered most likely to face Obama in the general election, accusing the president of attacking religious liberty.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 4:28am

Many statehouses are seeing student protests this month, as lawmakers deliberate over proposed budget cuts, and symbolism is a common part of the scene -- with students regularly producing coffins for public higher education and so forth. In Kentucky Tuesday, students decided to use a stereotype to make their point. They took off their shoes, WDRB 41 News reported. "If they're going to keep cutting higher education, we're going to fulfill our own stereotypes and we're going to end up being the barefoot state everyone makes fun of," said Olivia McMillen, a student at the University of Louisville.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

The increased public focus on community colleges makes this a time for policy makers and others to gain a better understanding of the demographics of the institutions, according to a brief released Tuesday by the American Association of Community Colleges. Many assumptions that people have about college enrollment generally, or about community colleges, are out of date, the brief argues. For instance, many people assume fall enrollment figures are a good indication of total enrollment. But at community colleges, unduplicated year-round enrollments are on average 56 percent higher than fall enrollments. Including non-credit students would further add to the total.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Michael Mills of the University of Northern Colorado explains the study of semiotics in today’s multicultural environment. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Stanford University announced Monday that it raised $6.2 billion between October 2006 and Dec. 31, 2011, shattering the record for the largest university fund-raising campaign in history and exceeding the university's original goal of $4.3 billion. Before Stanford's announcement, Yale held the record for the largest fund-raising campaign on record, raising $3.881 billion between 2004 and July 2011. Stanford's announcement even exceeds the largest announced goal, $6 billion, which the University of Southern California announced in August.

The $6.2 billion will go to fund cross-disciplinary initiatives in every area of the university, including more than 130 new endowed faculty appointments and 360 new fellowships for graduate students. Many large campaigns include gifts that are paid out over time, so it's particularly noteworthy that more than 80 percent of campaign commitments have already been fulfilled. The university has set up a website detailing what the money will be used for.

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