Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, July 5, 2011 - 3:00am

A Virginia jury on Thursday ruled that 16 former students who sued Virginia Western Community College are entitled to more than $50,000 each, backing their claim that the college misled them about the accreditation of its nursing program, The Roanoke Times reported. The students were enrolled when the college had conditional accreditation from the National League for Nursing, but evidence presented at the trial suggested that the college did not revise materials such as its website when that group withdrew accreditation. The state is considering an appeal -- and more student suits are pending.

Friday, July 1, 2011 - 3:00am

The longtime former president of Hocking College and his wife -- also a former official at the Ohio institution -- were charged Thursday with violations of ethics and other laws related to actions while in office, The Columbus Dispatch reported. John Light, who presided over Hocking for nearly 40 years, was charged for failing to report college-paid travel, while Roxanne DuVivier, a former vice president at Hocking, faces several conflict of interest charges, the newspaper reported. Hocking's successor had a very short tenure, ousted last month after clashes with the board.

Friday, July 1, 2011 - 3:00am

Historically, the University of California's campuses have not recruited undergraduates (or enrolled very many) from out of state. This wasn't surprising, given the high demand to get into its institutions, and the state's demographics, which produced highly diverse enrollments of Californians. But in the last two years, the system has stepped up out-of-state recruitment, with officials saying that they need the higher tuition revenue paid by these students. The latest numbers, as reported in The Los Angeles Times, show that 12.3 percent of freshmen this fall will be from out of state, up from 8 percent last fall. The non-California proportion is highest at Berkeley, 30 percent, up from 23 percent.

Friday, July 1, 2011 - 3:00am

Oxford University Press issued a statement Thursday affirming that it had not killed the "Oxford comma" (also called a serial comma), which appears before "and" in a series. Twitter and the blogosphere have been full of outrage over the reported elimination of the comma. As the Associated Press explained, the false reports were based on a style guide produced by the University of Oxford public relations office for press releases. For those following the Oxford University Press style, the comma lives on.

Friday, July 1, 2011 - 3:00am

Baltimore International College officials said the institution would explore a merger that might allow it to survive the stripping of its accreditation in June by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The revocation of accreditation for the culinary college was one of many negative actions that the regional accrediting agency imposed at its meeting last month, which added four colleges (Baltimore City Community College, Caribbean University, Luzerne County Community College,and Richmond, the American International University in London) to its rolls of institutions on probation and issued warnings to nine other colleges, listed below. Most of the institutions that Middle States placed on probation or warned were cited for their failure to provide evidence that they were assessing their own institutional effectiveness or the extent of student learning.

 

Four colleges (all campuses of the University of Puerto Rico) were continued on probation, while seven other branches of the Puerto Rican university were removed from probation.

Friday, July 1, 2011 - 3:00am

The American Association of Community Colleges on Thursday appointed a 36-member commission to take "a holistic look" at the mission of and challenges facing community colleges. Most of the commission members are current community college presidents, but the group also includes such experts on community colleges as Vincent Tinto, Distinguished University Professor at Syracuse University and Mark David Milliron, deputy director for postsecondary improvement at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; and university system chancellors such as William Kirwan of the University System of Maryland and Nancy Zimpher of the State University of New York.

Friday, July 1, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Robert Vanderlan of Cornell University explains the role poets played in creating one of the 20th century’s great media empires. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, June 30, 2011 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Catherine Snyder of Union Graduate College explains how brain function changes with age. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, June 30, 2011 - 3:00am
  • SCUP Annual Meeting 2011, Society for College and University Planning, July 23-27, Washington, D.C.
  • 2011 Annual Meeting and Exhibition, American Political Science Association, September 1-4, San Francisco.
  • NACAC 67th National Conference, National Association for College Admission Counseling, September 22-24, New Orleans, La.
  • Regional Conference & Exposition, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, October 5-7, St. Louis, Mo.
  • 25th Annual Conference, Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities, October 29-31, San Antonio, Tex.
  • These meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar on The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education. This listing will appear as a regular feature in this space.
    To submit a listing, click here.

    Thursday, June 30, 2011 - 3:00am

    Two blind students — backed by the National Federation of the Blind -- on Wednesday sued Florida State University over the use of technology that they maintain denies equal access to the blind. The suit mentions mathematics courses in which the students allege the university required the students to use an inaccessible Web-based application to complete homework and exams, and required the use of clickers that cannot be used by a blind person to respond to in-class questions and obtain bonus credit. The suit is the latest in a series by blind students over educational technology tools.

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