History

Who Is Crying Wolf?

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Some prominent liberal academics are soliciting short essays from faculty members and graduate students to document a pattern in American history of major social advances being opposed by conservatives who "cry wolf" about the impact of proposed reforms. The campaign -- known as the "Cry Wolf Project" -- hasn't been officially announced. But conservative bloggers obtained some of the solicitations of essays and published them this week, along with considerable criticism.

Tenure Beyond the Monograph

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Three national groups of historians -- the American Historical Association, the National Council on Public History and the Organization of American Historians -- have now all endorsed guidelines that suggest a new, broader approach to tenure when considering public historians.

Removing an Honor

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Thomas D. Russell, a professor of law at the University of Denver, said that his friends have varying reactions to the impact of a scholarly paper he published in March. His friends in public relations can't believe it took so long for the subject of the paper to respond to an image disaster. His historian friends, however, are amazed by the speed with which history research is having as concrete a result -- especially since this involves a decision in higher education, where change comes slowly.

Tough Love for the Humanities

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WASHINGTON -- While he described himself as “stunned” to be chosen as this year’s Jefferson Lecturer, Leon Kass was hardly apologetic. The University of Chicago professor is best known for the years he spent as chair of President Bush’s Council on Bioethics, and he was invited to give the lecture last fall by the then-chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Bruce Cole, himself twice appointed by President Bush.

'Know Your Enemy'

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There was a time, improbable though it may now seem, when it was not considered inherently dubious for academics to work with or for the government. For several decades in the mid-20th century, Soviet studies -- a field born of America's post-World War II desire to understand its ally-turned-enemy -- enjoyed a wealth of government funding and scholarly attention. In a new book, Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America's Soviet Experts, David C.

The Moral of the Story

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WASHINGTON -- The session, here at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians, was entitled “The Uses and Abuses of New Deal History” – but there was no question that those on the panel were more concerned with the latter. Their general tone, which seemed to be shared by those in the audience, was one of frustration; of anger at Republican lawmakers -- who, according to the panelists, are determined to repeat the same errors that brought about the Great Depression -- and dismay that so many Americans seem to be amenable to the idea.

History, Not Politics

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WASHINGTON -- Jonathan Spence came here to deliver a speech, but don't let that fool you: his address -- the 39th Annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, which took place Thursday -- in no way resembled the sort typically associated with D.C.

Opening Doors

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Students enroll at the first college in the United States with a Muslim mission and the first where everyone is a history major.

'Before Brown'

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When people talk about the demolition of the doctrine of "separate but equal," the case everyone focuses on is Brown v. Board of Education, the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark 1954 ruling. Four years earlier, however, the Supreme Court rejected that doctrine in a higher education case -- one that set the legal framework for Brown and helped shape the strategy of Thurgood Marshall in his assault on Jim Crow in education.

'Contesting Archives'

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It has long been said that the winners write the history books -- but those keeping the records may also have their own agendas. How can historians reconstruct the narratives of those who may have been precluded not only from writing history, but even from being "considered legitimate subjects of history and therefore of archival collection"?

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