Women

The Teaching Paradox

Women who teach English and other languages are more satisfied with classroom work than other aspects of their jobs, but report shame over pride in areas other than research, survey finds.

The Second Shift in Academic Medicine

Study points to unequal home patterns and lack of flexible work options as possible explanation for the departure of women from medical school faculties.

Ignorance About 'Stop the Clock' Policies

The best of colleges' "family friendly" policies may be profoundly unfriendly if you tell new parents about them, but not other key people -- such as those who evaluate those new parents for tenure.

Rejecting the Academic Fast Track

Graduate students increasingly care about a "family friendly" work environment -- and doubt they can find one at a research university, survey finds.

More Women on College Boards

National survey finds slow but steady progress in gender diversity among higher education trustees.

Half Empty or Half Full

New report attempts to gather key data on women in higher education -- students, faculty, administrators -- and to analyze key issues. In just about every category, study finds progress and disappointments.

Stopping the Clock ... on Grants

Congresswoman wants to use federal research agencies to promote advancement of women in university science departments.

Porn as Campus Attraction

Producers of new feature offer free screenings to colleges, some of which accept. At U. of Maryland, legislators get movie blocked.

'Standing Still' as Associate Profs

English and foreign language departments promote male associate professors to full professors on average at least a year -- and in some cases, depending on type of institutions, several years -- more speedily than they promote women, according to a study being released today by the Modern Language Association. Over all, the average time for women as associate professor prior to promotion is 8.2 years, compared to 6.6 years for men.

(Somewhat) Family Friendlier

Significantly more colleges have policies to help employees maneuver work/life balance than they did in 2002, but many approaches are informal, study finds.

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