Economics

Cruel Irony

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In response to a terrible economic downturn, the University of Southern Mississippi may eliminate its economics department and the professors within it.

'Research Confidential'

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For social scientists starting their careers, creating research models that work is crucial. A new book suggests that they may be unaware of problems they face in part because scholars don't share stories of what didn't work on their projects, and how to deal with particular challenges.

The Insecurity of Higher Ed Research

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Scholars of higher education debate relevance of their work, even as annual meeting features scores of compelling studies.

Proof That Mentoring Matters

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Study of economists -- complete with control group -- shows impact of coaching women on the process or getting published and winning grants.

Role Models and Stereotypes

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Study both backs up and challenges conventional wisdom about whether presence of female faculty members influences female students' choice of major.

No Entry

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Job crisis broadens. After MLA reports collapsing market for language professors, history and economics groups reveal huge drops in faculty positions.

The Back-Up Plan

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Many a successful journal article is published not in the publication where the author first submitted, but in another one, following rejection from the first. This trickle-down publication process helps get work reviewed and disseminated, but it also means long waits for authors, who can’t start the process with a second journal until they have been rejected by or withdrawn a submission from the first.

Job Satisfaction and Gender

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Numerous studies have pointed to a gap in job satisfaction between men and women in academe, with men generally happier with working conditions.

The Academy That Didn't Go Away

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Two years ago, it appeared that the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign had resolved a conflict with faculty leaders over the Academy on Capitalism and Limited Government.

'The Global Auction'

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College and university presidents in the United States and elsewhere regularly link the need for a higher education to individual and national needs for economic advancement. What if their underlying assumptions aren't true? Three social scientists from British universities challenge many of those assumptions in The Global Auction: The Broken Promises of Education, Jobs and Incomes, just published by Oxford University Press.

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