Economics

Ignorance About 'Stop the Clock' Policies

Smart Title: 

The best of colleges' "family friendly" policies may be profoundly unfriendly if you tell new parents about them, but not other key people -- such as those who evaluate those new parents for tenure.

Consumption and Happiness

Smart Title: 

Amherst professor teaches students to think about the link between the two and argues learning about it is as important as basic financial literacy.

What Does a Degree Cost?

Smart Title: 

That depends largely on how you frame the question, says a new study -- which provides some intriguing answers nonetheless.

Cruel Irony

Smart Title: 

In response to a terrible economic downturn, the University of Southern Mississippi may eliminate its economics department and the professors within it.

'Research Confidential'

Smart Title: 

For social scientists starting their careers, creating research models that work is crucial. A new book suggests that they may be unaware of problems they face in part because scholars don't share stories of what didn't work on their projects, and how to deal with particular challenges.

The Insecurity of Higher Ed Research

Smart Title: 

Scholars of higher education debate relevance of their work, even as annual meeting features scores of compelling studies.

Proof That Mentoring Matters

Smart Title: 

Study of economists -- complete with control group -- shows impact of coaching women on the process or getting published and winning grants.

Role Models and Stereotypes

Smart Title: 

Study both backs up and challenges conventional wisdom about whether presence of female faculty members influences female students' choice of major.

No Entry

Smart Title: 

Job crisis broadens. After MLA reports collapsing market for language professors, history and economics groups reveal huge drops in faculty positions.

The Back-Up Plan

Smart Title: 

Many a successful journal article is published not in the publication where the author first submitted, but in another one, following rejection from the first. This trickle-down publication process helps get work reviewed and disseminated, but it also means long waits for authors, who can’t start the process with a second journal until they have been rejected by or withdrawn a submission from the first.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Economics
Back to Top