Athletics

NCAA adopts, tables rules at convention

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Division I board takes action -- sort of -- on its controversial scholarship rules, and Divisions II and III ease recruiting restrictions.

At NCAA convention, educators question academic reform measures

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Educators want higher NCAA academic standards -- but they're not so sure the association has gone about it in the best way.

NCAA to consider legislation at annual convention

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It's been a wild year for the NCAA. At this week's national convention, Division I will be forced to modify or eliminate some of its reform initiatives, while Divisions II and III will look to ease recruiting regulations.

The NCAA women's basketball tournament, if academics mattered most

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Our annual look at who would win the NCAA's Division I women's basketball tournament if academics trumped athletic skill.

Facing scrutiny, college sports organizations ramp up lobbying efforts

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In December, an association representing the country's top athletics directors created a political action committee. It joins the National Collegiate Athletic Association's own lobbying efforts, which have more than doubled in the past five years.

Q&A with the author of new book on 'how to fix' college sports

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A new book argues that the NCAA "has lost its way in the governance of intercollegiate athletics" and that the association is incapable of achieving reform.

At NCAA meeting, college sports leaders recommend supporting athlete protests

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At NCAA meeting, college sports leaders say institutions should support athletes' right to protest and urge colleges to communicate better with their players.

Minnesota coach's support of team's protest draws criticism

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Minnesota football team has ended its boycott over the suspensions of 10 players accused of sexual assault, but coach’s comments in support of the team continue to draw criticism as taking sides against woman who brought complaint of gang rape.

Minnesota football players end boycott as details emerge about why 10 players were suspended

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Boycott by football players focused on issues of due process for 10 suspended athletes. But as university's investigation into sexual assault revealed damning details, support for the athletes ebbed and boycott was dropped.

Minnesota Football Players End Boycott

University of Minnesota football players on Saturday announced that they were ending their boycott of football activities, a boycott that they earlier suggested would extend to refusing to play in the Holiday Bowl.

The football players said they were boycotting to protest the suspension of 10 players on the team. The university did not announce a reason for the suspensions, but they are believed to be related to a sex assault investigation in which police declined to bring charges. A series of documents that have come out since the boycott started show that the university's investigation found that some suspended players violated rules barring sexual assault and others violated rules against sexual harassment.

Eric W. Kaler (right), president of the university, met with players after they declared their boycott but insisted that he would not reverse the suspensions, citing the importance of university "values" that may extend beyond legal standards of what constitutes criminal conduct.

In a statement released Friday, Kaler said, "One of my jobs as president is to put our institutional values at the forefront of all we do and ensure our actions are aligned with those values. This principle is far more important than any football game and the university community as a whole, and it is more important than any single athletic team. Some of the values that we hold, as a community, include: every member of the university community deserves to be treated with respect. Our student-athletes are important representatives of the university, and when they wear the M, they are held to a high standard of conduct. When the expectations for conduct are not met, there are consequences."

A statement from the football team announcing the end of the boycott started by declaring that "sexual harassment and violence against women have no place on this campus, on our team, in our society and at no time is it condoned." While the statement said the team members continue to have concerns about due process and "a lack of communication," it added that it has become clear the suspensions will not be lifted. The football players' statement said they were ending their boycott based on assurances that the suspended players would receive due process, and that support would be shown for the "character" of "the great majority" of players.

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